Exclusive Analysis of Trump's Middle East Peace Plan | World in :60

It is a significant departure in American diplomacy vis-à-vis Israel and Palestine. One big reason for that is that the realities of geopolitics in the Middle East have changed. Today, Israel–Palestine is not a particularly divisive issue of high priority among most of the Arab world. When you ask them what are the things they most worry about, they say Iran, they say Al-Qaeda and ISIS, they say domestic political developments, they say Yemen and Syria and Iraq and Libya.

The position of the Palestinians on the ground is a lot weaker than it used to be. They have less territory, there's been expansion of Israeli settlements despite international outcry against it. The Israelis no longer need Palestinian labor the way they used to — they have an Iron Dome around Israel, provided with American military support, that stops the Palestinians from being able to threaten the Israelis as much with missiles coming over. They have strong surveillance that makes it really hard for the Palestinians to engage in asymmetric warfare against Israel. All of that means that the Palestinians are frankly in a much worse position today than they were five, ten or twenty years ago. Trump Administration policy reflects that.

Are the US and China headed for a new Cold War over technology? Judging by what we heard a few days ago at the Munich Security Conference, a major trans-Atlantic gathering for world leaders and wonks, you'd certainly think so. US, European, and Chinese officials at the event all weighed in with strong words on the US campaign against Chinese 5G giant Huawei and much more. Here are the main insights we gleaned from the proceedings:

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Bloomberg takes the stage – Tomorrow's Democratic debate will be the first to feature media tycoon Mike Bloomberg, who in recent weeks has thrown hundreds of millions of dollars behind an ad campaign designed to position himself as a viable, moderate candidate who can beat Trump. As his support in national polls has climbed to nearly 20 percent, Bloomberg – who largely sat out the earlier rounds of Democratic campaigning – has come under attack for sexist comments in the past as well as his support, as NYC mayor, for "stop and frisk" policing tactics that disproportionately targeted people of color. Bloomberg will immediately be at war not only with the moderates whom he wants to displace – Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, and Joe Biden – but especially with the front running left-progressive Bernie Sanders. It will likely be quite ugly and we're certainly tuning in.

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150: As the Chinese government continues to expand travel restrictions, hoping that reducing human contact will stop the virus from spreading further, at least 150 million people are now facing government restrictions dictating how often they can leave their homes. That's more than 10 percent of the country's total population who are currently on lockdown. Some 760 million are under partial, locally enforced restrictions.

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While attending the Munich Security Conference, former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry was asked to respond to the news of the first coronavirus death outside of Asia. The victim, a Chinese tourist who arrived in France in January, was among 11 confirmed cases in that country. "I think everybody in the world needs to be concerned," Kerry told GZERO.

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