Hard Numbers

120 million: About 120 million people will go for a swim at the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers in India during a Hindu festival that runs until March.

160,000: Italians are quitting their country in record numbers at a time when the country's population is already shrinking thanks to live births at an all-time low. Some 160,000 Italians moved abroad in 2018, the largest number of emigrants since 1981.

860: The Iranian government arrested, imprisoned or executed at least 860 journalists in the three decades between the Islamic revolution in 1979 and 2009, according to documents leaked recently to Reporters Sans Frontieres, a media advocacy group. The files also revealed that 61,900 political prisoners had been held since the 1980s, with more than 500 of them aged 15-18.

371: In Nigeria, more people died last year in clashes over land between farmers and cattle-herders than were slain by the terrorist group Boko Haram. In the country's northwest, bandits killed 371 people and displaced 18,000 in the first seven months of 2018.

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And go deeper on topics like cybersecurity and artificial intelligence at Microsoft on The Issues.

Last weekend, world leaders, security experts, and business executives flocked to the Hotel Bayrischer Hof in Munich for the 55th annual Munich Security Conference. What's the Munich Security Conference? Think of it a bit like Davos, but with policymakers in dark suits rather than billionaires in Gore-Tex.

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Speaking of trans-Atlantic rifts, we've written previously about the US pushback against Huawei, arguably the world's most geopolitically significant technology company. The Trump administration has been trying to convinceits European allies to ban the Chinese tech giant from their next-generation 5G information networks, citing national security risks. Last week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo even warned of consequences for countries that don't toe Washington's line on the issue.

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Over the past 20 years, hundreds of millions of people in China have been pulled out of poverty by their country's staggering economic growth. Beijing today is a rising power on the global stage. That's all pretty great, and yet the country still ranks beneath war-torn Libya and perpetually melancholy Russia in the United Nations World Happiness Report. This week's Economist hazards a guess about what really makes people smile or scowl, but here's how China stacks up for joy against other countries.