Hard Numbers:

6: At least six people have been killed and more than 200 injured during rallies in Jakarta disputing the re-election of Indonesian President Joko Widodo.

-12.8: Compared to the last four presidents who were reelected, Donald Trump's popularity is historically weak. His net approval rating today (-12.8%) is about 14 points worse than Ronald Reagan's (1983) and 20 points worse than Barack Obama's (2011) at the same point in their presidencies. He's 25 points behind Bill Clinton (1995) and 45 points behind George W. Bush (2003). Given how little Trump's numbers have changed over the past three years, the path forward looks especially steep.

40: About 40 percent of US companies operating in China say they're considering relocating outside the country, according to a new study. In part, that's because some 47 percent of the members of the American Chamber of Commerce in China and a similar group based in Shanghai say they face retaliation for US tariffs in the form of slower customs clearance, more inspections, and delayed approvals for licenses.

70: How bad is street crime in Mexico City? Armed robberies have become common enough that for 300 to 500 pesos ($15 to $25) you can buy a fake cellphone to hand over instead of parting company with the real thing. The phones feature a realistic-looking startup screen and enough metal inside to mimic the weight of an actual mobile phone. There were an average of 70 muggings per day in Mexico City in the first four months of this year.

Wrecking the global economy's hopes for a relaxing late-August Friday, China and the US have taken fresh shots at each other in their deepening trade war.

First, China announced new tariffs on US goods in response to US levies on China's exports that are set to take effect next month.

Trump responded with a vintage tweet storm, lashing out at China and demanding that US firms stop doing business there. The Dow plunged as markets waited for the next shoe to drop. And drop it did: later in the day Trump announced higher tariffs on nearly everything that China exports to the United States.

Why now? Bear in mind, all of this comes right as Trump is leaving for this weekend's G7 summit in France. That gathering already promised to be a testy one – but with the global economy slowing, the impact of Trump's increasingly nasty trade war with China will add fresh tensions to the occasion.

So where are we in the trade war now? Here is an updated list of what measures each side has imposed to date, and what's next. Both sides have a lot at stake, but from the looks of it, the list isn't going to get shorter any time soon.

When Donald Trump first started talking about buying Greenland last week, we figured it was a weird story with less legs than a Harp seal.

Signal readers, we were wrong. President Trump was so serious about purchasing the autonomous Danish territory that this week he abruptly cancelled a trip to Denmark after the country's prime minister, Mette Frederiksen, labelled the idea "absurd."

More Show less

The Amazon in flames – More than 70,000 forest fires are burning in Brazil right now, most of them in the Amazon. That's up 84% over the same period last year, and it's the highest number on record. This is the dry season when farmers burn certain amounts of forest legally to clear farmland. But critics say Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro's efforts to loosen conservation rules have encouraged farmers, loggers, and miners to set more fires, many of them illegally. Bolsonaro – a science skeptic who recently fired the head of the agency that tracks deforestation – says, without proof, that NGOs are setting the fires to embarrass his government. Meanwhile, the EU is holding up a major trade deal with Brazil unless Bolsonaro commits to higher environmental protection standards, including those that affect the Amazon.

More Show less

Over the past fifty years, the Amazon rainforest has shrunk by an area equal to the size of Turkey. In the 1960s and 1970s, the Brazilian government supported settlement of the sparsely populated region for security reasons. Since then, huge swaths of the forest -- which is crucial for limiting the world's greenhouse gasses -- have been cleared for farmland used to feed Brazil's population and support its massive agricultural exports. Greater awareness of the environmental impacts in the 1990s produced tighter conservation regulations, though plenty of illegal clearing continues. In recent years, the annual deforestation rate has begun to rise again, and Brazil's new president Jair Bolsonaro has pledged to weaken regulations further in order to support businesses.