GZERO Media logo

Hard Numbers: A global displacement boom, cheap Dutch, gasping Peruvians, air concerns in India and Nigeria

Hard Numbers: A global displacement boom, cheap Dutch, gasping Peruvians, air concerns in India and Nigeria

11 million: Nearly 80 million people were forcibly displaced from their homes due to conflict, violence, persecution and human rights violations in 2019, the UN announced on Thursday. More than 11 million of those people were added to the list last year, almost double the amount of people displaced in the entire preceding decade. UNHCR attributed the surge to new displacements in hotspots like the DRC, Syria, and Yemen...and because they are counting Venezuela for the first time.


61: A recent poll found that 61 percent of Dutch voters dislike the EU's coronavirus economic rescue package, which would give member states 500 billion euros in non-repayable grants. The Netherlands leads a "Frugal Four" bloc alongside Austria, Denmark and Sweden that opposes the plan, while it is supported by France and Germany, as well as highly-indebted southern states hit hard by COVID-19 such Italy and Spain.The plan requires the support of all 27 EU countries to pass.

1,000: In Peru, home to Latin America's second biggest coronavirus outbreak, oxygen bottles are now so scarce that they are selling for a 1,000 percent markup on their usual price. To make matters worse, counterfeiters are flooding the black market with dangerous low-quality knockoffs. As public health workers protest to demand more personal protective equipment, the government is scrambling to prevent a total collapse of the economy.

90: An overwhelming majority of Indians and Nigerians are fed up with pollution and unlivable cities. Up to 90 percent of respondents in a new survey from both countries said they want to raise air quality in urban areas. Coronavirus-related lockdowns around the world have dramatically reduced air pollution, but experts fear emission levels will return back to normal after the pandemic, especially in countries with poor environmental oversight.

Microsoft released a new annual report, called the Digital Defense Report, covering cybersecurity trends from the past year. This report makes it clear that threat actors have rapidly increased in sophistication over the past year, using techniques that make them harder to spot and that threaten even the savviest targets. For example, nation-state actors are engaging in new reconnaissance techniques that increase their chances of compromising high-value targets, criminal groups targeting businesses have moved their infrastructure to the cloud to hide among legitimate services, and attackers have developed new ways to scour the internet for systems vulnerable to ransomware. Given the leap in attack sophistication in the past year, it is more important than ever that steps are taken to establish new rules of the road for cyberspace: that all organizations, whether government agencies or businesses, invest in people and technology to help stop attacks; and that people focus on the basics, including regular application of security updates, comprehensive backup policies, and, especially, enabling multi-factor authentication. Microsoft summarized some of the most important insights in this year's report, including related suggestions for people and businesses.

Read the whole post and report at Microsoft On The Issues.

On Tuesday night, you can finally watch Trump and Biden tangle on the debate stage. But you TOO can go head to head on debate night .. with your fellow US politics junkies.

Print out GZERO's handy debate BINGO cards and get ready to rumble. There are four different cards so that each player may have a unique board. Every time one of the candidates says one of these words or terms, X it on your card. First player to get five across wins. And if you really want to jazz it up, you can mark each of your words by taking a swig of your drink, or doing five burpees, or donating to your favorite charity or political candidate. Whatever gets you tipsy, in shape, or motivated, get the bingo cards here. It's fight night!

More Show less

GZERO Media, in partnership with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and Eurasia Group, today hosted its second virtual town hall on the hunt for a COVID-19 vaccine and the challenges of its distribution.

The panel was moderated by New York Times science and health reporter Apoorva Mandavilli and featured Gates Foundation's Deputy Director of Vaccines & Human Immunobiology, Lynda Stuart; Eurasia Group's Rohitesh Dhawan, Managing Director of Energy, Climate & Resources; Gates Foundation CEO Mark Suzman; and Gayle E. Smith, the president & CEO of ONE Campaign and former Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Watch the full video above.

The enormous scale of the coronavirus pandemic was captured earlier this week as the global death toll surpassed 1 million people. As the weight of the grim milestone sunk in, the New York Times noted that COVID-19 has now killed more people this year than the scourges of HIV, malaria, influenza, and cholera — combined. While some countries like Germany and South Korea are models in how to curb the virus' spread through social distancing and mask wearing, other countries around the world have recently seen caseloads surge again, raising fears of a dreaded "second wave" of infections. Here's a look at countries where the per-capita caseload has spiked in recent days.

Donald Trump's presidency has irked a lot of people around the world. And in fairness, that's no surprise. He was elected in part to blow up long-standing assumptions about how international politics, trade, and diplomatic relations are supposed to work.

But while he has correctly identified some big challenges — adapting NATO to the 21st century, managing a more assertive China, or ending America's endless wars in Afghanistan and Iraq — his impulsive style, along with his restrictions on trade and immigration, have alienated many world leaders. Global polls show that favorable views of the US have plummeted to all-time lows in many countries, particularly among traditional American allies in Europe.

More Show less
UNGA banner

GZEROMEDIA

Subscribe to GZERO Media's Newsletter: Signal