Hard Numbers: Coronavirus deaths now surpass SARS toll

57: The American public's view of the economy is as positive as it's been in twenty years, with 57 percent of Americans surveyed agreeing that the nation's economy is in "excellent" or "good'' shape, according to a Pew poll. But people's viewpoints are sharply partisan: only 39 percent of Democrats agree that the economy is doing well.


2.6 billion: Ahead of President Trump's visit to India later this month, New Delhi is set to purchase $2.6 billion worth of military helicopters from the United States. India's defense purchases from the US have surged in the last decade as New Delhi, worried about Chinese influence in the region, has drawn closer to the US while pivoting away from its traditional arms suppliers in Russia.

900: The global death toll from the deadly Wuhan coronavirus has reached 900, officially surpassing the 2002-03 SARS outbreak that killed 813 people in China and other parts of Asia. However, the coronavirus – which has killed around 2 percent of people who have contracted it – is less fatal overall than SARS, which killed around 10 percent.

6.5 million: The personal data of all 6.5 million eligible voters in Israel was leaked due to a "grave" security lapse on an app that provides news and information about the upcoming election on March 2. The leak, which includes voters' full names, ID card numbers, and addresses, appears to be related to the app's poor coding, and required no hacking skills.

Kevin Sneader, global managing partner of McKinsey & Company, answers the question: Are CEOs getting real about climate change?

The answer, yes. Why? One, it's personal. Many have watched with horror the wildfires that took place recently. Others have even been evacuated. And for some, the snow set in Davos, they experienced incredibly mild temperatures that laid all to quip that climate change really has arrived. But the other reasons are a growing understanding of the nature of climate change.

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Welcome to the eleventh parliamentary elections in Iran's 40-year history.

Want to run for a seat? You can…if you're an Iranian citizen between the ages of 30 and 75, hold a master's degree or its equivalent, have finished your military service (if you're a man), and have demonstrated a commitment to Islam. Check all these boxes, and you can ask permission to run for office.

Permission comes from the 12-member Guardian Council, a body composed of six clerics appointed by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and six jurists that Khamenei appoints indirectly. If the Council says yes, you can win a seat in parliament. If they say no, you can't.

This parliament, also called the Majlis, does have real power. It approves the national budget, drafts legislation and sends it to the Guardian Council for approval, ratifies treaties, approves ministers and can question the president. The current Majlis represents a wide range of values and opinions.

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As the head of a leading management consulting firm, global managing partner of McKinsey & Company Kevin Sneader has an inside view into the challenges facing the world's top executives. Every Thursday, Sneader will address questions about key issues like attracting and retaining talent, growing revenue, navigating change, staying ahead of the competition, and corporate responsibility – all in 60 seconds.

GZERO's Alex Kliment interviews New Yorker correspondent and author Joshua Yaffa. The two discuss Yaffa's new book, Between Two Fires, about what life is like for Russians today. They also sample some vodka at a famous Russian restaurant in NYC, of course!