Hard Numbers: Coronavirus deaths now surpass SARS toll

Hard Numbers: Coronavirus deaths now surpass SARS toll

57: The American public's view of the economy is as positive as it's been in twenty years, with 57 percent of Americans surveyed agreeing that the nation's economy is in "excellent" or "good'' shape, according to a Pew poll. But people's viewpoints are sharply partisan: only 39 percent of Democrats agree that the economy is doing well.


2.6 billion: Ahead of President Trump's visit to India later this month, New Delhi is set to purchase $2.6 billion worth of military helicopters from the United States. India's defense purchases from the US have surged in the last decade as New Delhi, worried about Chinese influence in the region, has drawn closer to the US while pivoting away from its traditional arms suppliers in Russia.

900: The global death toll from the deadly Wuhan coronavirus has reached 900, officially surpassing the 2002-03 SARS outbreak that killed 813 people in China and other parts of Asia. However, the coronavirus – which has killed around 2 percent of people who have contracted it – is less fatal overall than SARS, which killed around 10 percent.

6.5 million: The personal data of all 6.5 million eligible voters in Israel was leaked due to a "grave" security lapse on an app that provides news and information about the upcoming election on March 2. The leak, which includes voters' full names, ID card numbers, and addresses, appears to be related to the app's poor coding, and required no hacking skills.

Carbon has a bad rep, but did you know it's a building block of life? As atoms evolved, carbon trapped in CO2 was freed, giving way to the creation of complex molecules that use photosynthesis to convert carbon to food. Soon after, plants, herbivores, and carnivores began populating the earth and the cycle of life began.

Learn more about how carbon created life on Earth in the second episode of Eni's Story of CO2 series.

As we enter the homestretch of the US presidential election — which is set to be the most contentious, and possibly contested, in generations — Americans are also voting on 35 seats up for grabs in a battle for the control of the Senate. The 100-member body is currently held 53-47 by the Republican Party, but many individual races are wide open, and the Democrats are confident they can flip the upper chamber of Congress.

Either way, the result will have a profound impact not only on domestic policy, but also on US foreign relations and other issues with global reach. Here are a few areas where what US senators decide reverberates well beyond American shores.

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In a special GZERO Media livestream on global response and recovery amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Eurasia Group & GZERO Media president Ian Bremmer discussed the difference between Europe's unified approach to economic stimulus and the deeply divided and political nature of the current conversation in the US. While initial stimulus support was bipartisan, there is little chance of Democrats and Republicans coming together again ahead of the November 3 presidential election. "It's red state versus blue state. President Trump's saying that coronavirus isn't so bad if you take the blue states out. He's president of the blue states, you can't take the blue states out," Bremmer told moderator Susan Glasser of The New Yorker.

GZERO Media caught up with Japan's Permanent Representative to the UN Kimihiro Ishikane during the 2020 UN General Assembly. In an interview with Eurasia Group Vice Chairman Gerald Butts, Ishikane talked about pandemic response, and how it has impacted the broader picture of US-China relations. Regarding a global fissure potentially caused by the world's two biggest economies, Ishikane said: "China is not like the former Soviet Union. Our system is completely intertwined, and I don't think we can completely decouple our economy and neither is that desirable." He also discussed the legacy of Shinzo Abe, Japan's longest-serving prime minister, who stepped down recently due to health complications.

The world's two biggest economic powers threaten to create a "big rupture" in geopolitics, but "we are not there yet," UN Secretary-General António Guterres tells Ian Bremmer. In an interview for GZERO World, the leader of the world's best-known multilateral organization discusses the risks involved as the US and China grow further apart on key issues.

Watch the episode: UN Secretary-General António Guterres: Why we still need the United Nations

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