Hard Numbers: Water Stress and Amazon Deforestation

1/4: A new report from the World Resources Institute found that countries containing one quarter of the world's population are at risk of running out of water. It also found that 33 of the world's largest cities, with a combined population of more than 250 million, face extremely high water stress, with dangerous implications for public health. Cities at greatest risk include Beijing, New Delhi, Dhaka, Riyadh, Cairo, Mexico City, and Los Angeles.


278: Brazil's President Bolsonaro doesn't like it when critics call him "Capitão Motoserra" (Captain Chainsaw), but new evidence suggests he has indeed fast-tracked deforestation in the Amazon. Preliminary data from Brazil's National Institute for Space Research revealed an estimated 870 square miles of Amazon forest cleared in July, an area about half the size of Philadelphia. That's reportedly a 278 percent increase from July 2018.

400: Some Romans are fed up with disrespect for their most famous monuments and landmarks, and their city council has taken action to stop it. You probably know better than to bathe in Trevi Fountain, but you'll also risk a fine of €400 if you sit on the city's famed Spanish Steps. Not all Romans agree with these rules.

42: US users of Facebook reportedly spend about 42 minutes a day on the site, according to eMarketer, a research firm. Missouri Senator Josh Hawley has proposed something he calls the "Social Media Addiction Reduction Technology Act," which would limit all social media usage to 30 minutes per day.

Imagine losing your child in their first year of life and having no idea what caused it. This is the heartbreaking reality for thousands of families each year who lose a child to Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID). Despite decades-long efforts to prevent SUID, it remains the leading cause of death for children between one month and one year of age in developed nations. Working in collaboration with researchers at Seattle Children's Research Institute and the University of Auckland, Microsoft analyzed the Center for Disease Control (CDC) data on every child born in the U.S. over a decade, including over 41 million births and 37,000 SUID deaths.

By pairing Microsoft's capabilities and data scientists with Seattle Children's medical research expertise, progress is being made on identifying the cause of SUID. Earlier this year, a study was published that estimated approximately 22% of SUID deaths in the U.S. were attributable to maternal cigarette-smoking during pregnancy, giving us further evidence that, through our collaboration with experts in varying disciplines, we are getting to the root of this problem and making remarkable advances.

Read more at Microsoft On The Issues.

After a months-long investigation into whether President Donald Trump pressured Ukraine's president into investigating his political rivals in order to boost his reelection prospects in 2020, House Democrats brought two articles of impeachment against him, charging him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Click here for our GZERO guide to what comes next.

In the meantime, imagine for a moment that you are now Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority leader and senior member of Donald Trump's Republican Party. You've got big choices to make.

More Show less

Trump gets his deal – House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced yesterday that Democrats will back the USMCA, the US-Mexico-Canada trade agreement that will replace the North American Free Trade Agreement. Crucially, the bill will also have support from the nation's largest labor union. This is a major political victory for President Trump, who promised he would close this deal, but it's also good for Pelosi: it shows that the Democrats' House majority can still accomplish big things even as it impeaches the president. But with the speed of the Washington news cycle these days, we're watching to see if anyone is still talking about USMCA three days after it's signed.

More Show less

After a months-long investigation into whether President Donald Trump pressured Ukraine's president into investigating his political rivals in order to boost his reelection prospects in 2020, House Democrats on Tuesday brought two articles of impeachment against him. They charge Trump with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

So, what are the next steps?

More Show less