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Iran's Qassim Suleimani assassinated! Ian Bremmer discusses

Who was Qassem Soleimani and why did the US target him?

Well, he's the most important military leader in Iran. The architect of their proxy warfare and terrorist network across the region, which made him one of most important antagonists of the United States. He specifically was targeted because of his involvement in ordering attacks against an American base in Iraq, led to the injury of US soldiers and the killing of one US military contractor. The fact that he was killed is a major escalation in the confrontation between the US and Iran that has been going on really since the US withdrew from the Iranian nuclear deal.


How will Iran respond and what does this mean for Trump?

Well, I mean, Iran has said that they're going to respond in kind, but in kind would mean that the Iranians were going to attack you know, Secretary of Defense Esper, or Pompeo, or Pence, and they're not going to do that because that that would basically lead to the end of the Iranian regime. They're aware of the power asymmetries and what the United States has done to Iran and what they would. They will need to escalate. And that escalation probably involves targets of American facilities inside Iraq. But the problem is that it also means that Iranian proxies who had been controlled by this guy, Soleimani, aren't anymore. And so, their level of autonomy which always mattered, will suddenly become greatest. The potential for accidents is really real. Look, I do not believe the US is today at war with Iran, but the potential for this to escalate in a meaningful way has, of course, gotten a lot higher. Final point here is I'd say Trump is not wagging the dog. If Trump had been looking for an excuse to go to war against Iran, he had ample numbers of them with the big drones that have been taken down, with the tankers that have been bombed and have been captured, and especially when they hit Saudi Arabia's major oil facility, took 50 percent of Saudi oil off the markets. But for Trump and his administration, attacking Americans and the US Embassy in Baghdad were red lines that led to this behavior, certainly created more deterrence, certainly created more understanding from Iran of what they can and can't do without the Americans responding. Hopefully that's a bit of a silver lining in what otherwise is a very dangerous environment in Middle East.

Empathy and listening are key to establishing harmonious relationships, as demonstrated by Callista Azogu, GM of Human Resources & Organization for Nigerian Agip Oil Company (NAOC), an Eni subsidiary in Abuja. "To build trust is very difficult. To destroy it is very easy," says Callista, whose busy days involve everything from personnel issues to union relationships. She sees great potential for her native Nigeria not only because of the country's natural resources, but because of its vibrant and creative people.

Learn more about Callista in this episode of Faces of Eni.

Saturday will mark the beginning of an historic turning point for European politics as 1,001 voting members of Germany's Christian Democratic Union, the party of Chancellor Angela Merkel, hold an online conference to elect a new leader.

Here are the basic facts:

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They call it Einstein. It's the multibillion-dollar digital defense system the US has used to catch outside hackers and attackers since 2003. But it was no match for what's looking like one of the biggest cyber breaches in US history. Ian Bremmer breaks it down.

Watch the GZERO World episode: Cyber attack: an act of espionage or war?

Since Martin Luther King Jr delivered his iconic "I have a dream" speech in August 1963, the number of Black Americans elected to the United States Congress has dramatically increased. Still, it wasn't until 2019, more than half a century later, that the share of Black members serving in the House of Representatives reflected the percentage of Black Americans in the broader population —12 percent. To date, only six states have sent a Black representative to serve in the US Senate (recent runoff elections will make Georgia the seventh state), and many states have never elected a Black representative to either house of Congress. Here's a look at Black representation in every US Congress since 1963.

More than 32 million COVID shots have now been administered globally, raising hopes that the light at the end of the tunnel is now in sight.

The US has vaccinated 3 percent of its total population, while the UK is nearing a solid 5 percent inoculation rate. In Israel, which has been hailed as a vaccine success story, almost 24 percent of people have already received at least one dose of a COVID vaccine.

But while many countries are able to glimpse the outlines of a post-COVID world, there is a huge population of people who are being left out entirely. Refugees, as well as displaced, undocumented, and stateless people around the world remain ineligible for inoculations and vulnerable to the coronavirus.

We take a look at three case studies where powerless populations are being left in the lurch.

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