Hard Numbers

2,000,000: Bangladesh needs to create roughly 2 million new jobs every year to keep pace with an expanding population. But job growth in the country’s most important industry, textiles, is getting clobbered by automation. As robots get better at light industrial tasks like apparel manufacturing, whole swaths of the developing world are about to get stretched tight.


92: Some 92 percent of Brazilians are worried about the inability to discern fake news from real news online, according to a poll done late last year. That is the highest percentage of any country surveyed. Germany, as it happens, is the only country where a majority of citizens are not worried about this problem. The Brazilian government is currently cobbling together a strategyto fight fake news ahead of the country’s pivotal presidential election this fall — but is it too little too late?

81: The US government tried to influence democratic elections in other countries 81 times between 1946 and 2000, according to a recent study from a Carnegie Mellon professor. The tally for the Soviet Union and Russia is just 36 over the same period, though that count is certainly incomplete. #glasshouses #stones

61: Although Turkey’s ruling AKP party is often characterized as an Islamist party, 61 percent of its members say Turkey should be a secular state with no official religion, and an astounding 80 percent revere Kemal Ataturk, the ruthlessly secular founder of modern Turkey. A reminder that in Turkey Islamism, conservatism, and nationalism may overlap, but they aren’t the same thing.

33: About a 33 percent of Italian voters are still undecided ahead of pivotal elections in two weeks. Whether those voters end up siding with Berlusconi’s Forza Italia, the anti-immigrant Lega Nord, or the anti-establishment 5-Star Movement, will ultimately determine who plays the role of political kingmaker. Into the wolf’s mouth with all of them…

"I think there are certain times where you have tectonic shifts and change always happens that way."

On the latest episode of 'That Made All the Difference,' Vincent Stanley, Director of Philosophy at Patagonia, shares his thoughts on the role we all have to play in bringing our communities and the environment back to health.

For many, Paul Rusesabagina became a household name after the release of the 2004 tear-jerker film Hotel Rwanda, which was set during the 1994 Rwandan genocide.

Rusesabagina, who used his influence as a hotel manager to save the lives of more than 1,000 Rwandans, has again made headlines in recent weeks after he was reportedly duped into boarding a flight to Kigali, Rwanda's capital, where he was promptly arrested on terrorism, arson, kidnapping and murder charges. Rusesabagina's supporters say he is innocent and that the move is retaliation against the former "hero" for his public criticism of President Paul Kagame, who has ruled the country with a strong hand since ending the civil war in the mid 1990s.

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Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

It's UNGA week, very unusual New York to have the United Nations General Assembly meetings. You know, the city is locked down. It's almost always locked down this week, but usually you can't get anywhere because you've got all these marshals with dozens of heads of state and well over a hundred foreign ministers and their delegations jamming literally everything, Midtown and branching out across the city. This time around, the security cordon for the United Nations itself is barely a block, and no one is flying in. I mean, the weather is gorgeous, and you can walk pretty much anywhere, but nothing's really locked down aside from, of course, the fact that the restaurants and the bars and the theaters and everything else is not happening given the pandemic. And it's not just in the US, it's all around the world.

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Listen: Have you ever heard of Blue Zones? They're communities all around the globe—from Sardinia to Okinawa to Loma Linda, CA—where residents exceed the average human lifespan by years, and even decades. While they've been studied for the lessons we can learn about health, lifestyle, and environment, you don't have to live in a Blue Zone to experience increased longevity. It's happening everywhere. In fact, the number of people over 80 is expected to triple by 2050, reaching nearly half a billion. This episode of Living Beyond Borders focuses on the geopolitical and economic implications of an aging global population, how to make the most of new chapters in your life as you age, and what it all means for your money and the world around you.

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Born in the ashes of World War II, the United Nations now marks its 75th anniversary amid another global crisis. But is the world ready to come together today as it did decades ago? Ian Bremmer offers a brief history of the organization, and some memorable moments from years gone by, as the UN's 193 member states gather virtually for the 2020 General Assembly.

Watch the episode: UN Secretary-General António Guterres: Why we still need the United Nations


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Episode 4: The World Goes Gray

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