Hard Numbers

46.9 billion: The United States signed foreign arms deals worth $46.9 billion during the first half of the fiscal year. That already comfortably exceeds the $41.9 billion in weapons deals agreed to during all of fiscal 2017.


26 billion: Mexican president-elect, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, spelled out his infrastructure priorities on Monday, including the construction of 300 new rural roads, a tourist train between the resort city of Cancun and the southeastern state of Chiapas, and a new airport for Mexico City. The government plans to fund the estimated $26 billion cost of the projects by cutting government salaries and benefits, streamlining purchases, and stamping out corruption.

6,000: The European Commission this week offered to pay 6,000 euros to member states for each migrant they take in after making the arduous journey across the Mediterranean – part of a broader EU proposal to house refugees in dedicated centers while their asylum claims are processed. As of May, the number of migrants arriving in Europe by sea was running at about half the level seen during the first five months of 2017.

8.5: Ethiopia’s economy is forecast to grow 8.5 percent this year. That's one of the fastest rates for any country in the world, and it's providing recently-appointed Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed the political cover to pursue difficult reforms.

4.2: The Turkish lira fell by as much as 4.2 percent against the dollar on Tuesday after the central bank held interest rates steady, defying market expectations of an interest rate hike and raising concerns about the bank's independence. President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who assumed office with broadly expanded powers earlier this month, and recently appointed his son-in-law finance minister, railed against high rates despite the country facing its worst inflation in 14 years.


How will our cities and lives change in the future? What about a structure with a roller skating rink above a swimming pool, made out of transparent solar panels that power the entire park? This was the innovation invented by Eni's young researchers based on Luminescent Solar Concentrators, developed through Eni's research.

Watch the latest episode of Funny Applications, Eni's video series that imagines new uses for technology.

In an interview with GZERO World host Ian Bremmer, Hong Kong lawmaker Dennis Kwok, an outspoken pro-democracy advocate, expresses his concerns that the current "draconian" laws China's leadership is forcing upon his city has expedited the end of the "one country, two systems" policy established in 1997.

For 30 years, citizens of Hong Kong have gathered in Victoria Park on the evening of June 4 to honor the peaceful protesters massacred in Beijing's Tiananmen Square on that date in 1989. It has been the only public Tiananmen commemoration permitted on Chinese soil.

This year, the park was surrounded by barricades to keep people out. The officially stated reason for the shut-down? Crowds spread coronavirus. (In this city of more than 7 million, COVID has so far killed four people.)

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Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, helps us make sense of today's stories in technology:

What kind of technology is law enforcement using in their standoff with protesters?

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Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Big news, of course, that former Secretary of Defense Mattis comes out with a public statement basically calling Trump's rule, his actions, unconstitutional and unfit for office, more divisive than any president he's ever seen.

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