Hard Numbers

4 million: The total number of Venezuelans displaced by the country’s ongoing political and economic crisis may have already reached 4 million, according to The Economist. At the current rate, the exodus could surpass the 6 million who fled Syria during the entirety of its civil war.


71: Despite substantial evidence to the contrary, 71 percent of Russians don’t believe their government tried to influence the 2016 US presidential election, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. That’s a testament to the effectiveness of Vladimir Putin’s propaganda machine.

60: While the global price of oil has increased by about 6 percent this year, the price tag for Turkey has risen by more than 60 percent because of the large depreciation in its currency. That adds insult to injury for a beleaguered economy that imports roughly 75 percent of its energy.

15: With around 15 percent of its imports coming from neighboring Iran, Iraq has started to feel the knock-on effect of America’s push to reimpose tough economic sanctions on Tehran. In an important turnaround, the government of Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi signaled this week that it might ask the US for sanctions exemptions to help stem the pain.

5: Residents of Beijing can breathe easy—as the central government makes a push for clean energy, five of the seven months with the lowest air pollution in the capital city have been recorded since the beginning of last summer, according to data gathered by the US Embassy in Beijing.

Paper was originally made from rags until the introduction of cellulose in 1800. Since then, it has transformed into a "circular" industry, with 55% of paper produced in Italy recovered. It no longer just comes from trees, either. Some companies produce paper with scraps from the processing of other products like wool and walnuts.

Learn more about this rags to riches story in Eni's new Energy Superfacts series.

Donald Trump can still win re-election in November, but foreign governments read the same polls we do. They know that Joe Biden heads into the homestretch with a sizeable polling lead — both nationally and in the states most likely to decide the outcome. Naturally, they're thinking ahead to what a Biden foreign policy might look like.

They're probably glad that Biden gives them a half-century track record to study. (He was first elected to local office in 1970 and to the US Senate in 1972.) The six years he spent as ranking member, then chairman, of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, his term as co-chairman of the Senate's NATO Observer Group, and his eight years as Barack Obama's vice president tell them that he's essentially a "liberal internationalist," a person who believes that America must lead a global advance of democracy and freedom — and that close cooperation with allies is essential for success.

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On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer explores the escalating tension between the world's two biggest geopolitical and economic players—the US and China. With guest Zanny Minton Beddoes, Editor-in-Chief of The Economist, Bremmer discusses the modern history of China after the fall of the Soviet Union and why another Cold War might be inevitable.

Watch the episode.


On the GZERO World Podcast, Ian Bremmer explores the escalating tension between the world's two biggest geopolitical and economic players—the US and China. With guest Zanny Minton Beddoes, Editor-in-Chief of The Economist, Bremmer discusses the modern history of China after the fall of the Soviet Union and why another Cold War might be inevitable.

Donald Trump, Jair Bolsonaro, and Vladimir Putin gather via Zoom for a meeting of the Pandemic Presidents. But who's the top Corona King of them all? #PUPPETREGIME