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HARD NUMBERS

35,000: Over the past two years, around 35,000 people from across Africa have converged in a lawless region along the border between Niger and Algeria seeking nothing less than a pot of gold. Niger’s largest artisanal goldmine, Tchibarakaten, has become the site of an African gold rush, as those seeking money to send home or fund the increasingly expensive journey across the Mediterranean have flocked to the remote region in droves.


10: After a reshuffle this week, women hold 10 of 20 cabinet posts in Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s government. The shake-up, which included the appointment of the country’s first female defense minister, comes amid a broader political opening that has seen the release of thousands of political prisoners and the end of Ethiopia’s 20-year conflict with Eritrea.

3: Australia’s Senate defeated a motion declaring that it is “OK to be white” by only three votes this week. The motion, put forward by the leader of Australia’s right-wing One Nation party, echoed a phrase used by white nationalists, and was intended as a swipe at “anti-white racism.” Prime Minister Scott Morrison called the level of support for the motion “regrettable,” while the government attributed the close vote to an administrative error.

0: Two years into the Trump presidency, the US has yet to appoint ambassadors to both Turkey and Saudi Arabia. The recent flare up between the countries over the alleged killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi highlights outstanding staffing gaps in US embassies around the world, as it has fallen on Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to travel to both countries in an effort to ease tensions.

Khant Thaw Htoo is a young engineer who works in Eni's Sakura Tower office in the heart of Yangon. As an HSE engineer, he monitors the safety and environmental impact of onshore and offshore operations. He also looks out for his parents' well-being, in keeping with Myanmar's traditions.

Learn more about Khant in the final episode of the Faces of Eni series, which focuses on Eni's employees around the world.

On his first day as president, Joe Biden signed a remarkable series of executive orders. Boom! The US rejoins the Paris Climate Accord. Bang! The United States rejoins the World Health Organization. Pow! No more ban on immigration from many Muslim-majority countries. Biden's press secretary reminded reporters later in the day that all these orders merely begin complex processes that take time, but the impact is still dramatic.

If you lead a country allied with the US, or you're simply hoping for some specific commitment or clear and credible statement of purpose from the US government, you might feel a little dizzy today. The sight of an American president (Barack Obama) signing his name, of the next president (Donald Trump) erasing that name from the same legislation/bill, and then the following president (Biden) signing it back into law again will raise deep concerns over the long-term reliability of the world's still-most-powerful nation.

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Renowned tech journalist Kara Swisher has no doubt that social media companies bear responsibility for the January 6th pro-Trump riots at the Capitol and will likely be complicit in the civil unrest that may continue well into Biden's presidency. It's no surprise, she argues, that the online rage that platforms like Facebook and Twitter intentionally foment translated into real-life violence. But if Silicon Valley's current role in our national discourse is untenable, how can the US government rein it in? That, it turns out, is a bit more complicated. Swisher joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

"There needs to be a dramatic and deep reduction in the amount of debt on the poorest countries. That's clear." As the world's poorest nations struggle to recover from a devastating pandemic, World Bank President David Malpass argues that freeing them of much of their debt will be key. His conversation with Ian Bremmer is part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Listen: Renowned tech journalist Kara Swisher has no qualms about saying that social media companies bear responsibility for the January 6th pro-Trump riots at the Capitol and will likely be complicit in the civil unrest that may continue well into Biden's presidency. It's no surprise, she argues, that the online rage that platforms like Facebook and Twitter intentionally foment translated into real-life violence. But if Silicon Valley's current role in our national discourse is untenable, how can the US government rein it in? That, it turns out, is a bit more complicated. Swisher joins Ian Bremmer on our podcast.

The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

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