HARD NUMBERS

10,000: The number of newly-enrolled foreign-born students in US universities decreased by nearly 10,000 in 2016, the latest year for which data is available, according to a new report from the Institute of International Education. That’s the first such decline in 12 years.


 

100: Israeli warplanes have carried out more than 100 airstrikes in Gaza in recent days, after violence erupted following the deaths of 10 Palestinian fighters and an Israeli commando in a botched special forces operation. The flare up in violence – which also saw 400 rockets and mortars fired from Gaza into Israel – is the worst in between the two sides since 2014.

 

30: Russia may be the biggest beneficiary of newly-imposed US sanctions on Iranian oil exports. Last month, Russia pumped an average of 11.4 million barrels of the black stuff per day – a 30-year record – amid higher global oil prices and a push in many countries to replace Iranian barrels.

 

7: The military is among the most trusted institutions in Mexico according to a recent poll, with citizens rating their confidence in the country’s fighting forces a 7 out of 10. Only the church and universities ranked higher. Mexico’s political parties ranked last, at 5.1 out of 10 – below even the country’s notoriously corrupt police, which came in at 5.5.

 

3: The preparations of the government of Papua New Guinea for this weekend’s APEC leaders’ summit included hiring three cruise ships to house foreign dignitaries and media, due to a lack of hotel rooms in the country’s capital, Port Moresby.

"I think there are certain times where you have tectonic shifts and change always happens that way."

On the latest episode of 'That Made All the Difference,' Vincent Stanley, Director of Philosophy at Patagonia, shares his thoughts on the role we all have to play in bringing our communities and the environment back to health.

For many, Paul Rusesabagina became a household name after the release of the 2004 tear-jerker film Hotel Rwanda, which was set during the 1994 Rwandan genocide.

Rusesabagina, who used his influence as a hotel manager to save the lives of more than 1,000 Rwandans, has again made headlines in recent weeks after he was reportedly duped into boarding a flight to Kigali, Rwanda's capital, where he was promptly arrested on terrorism, arson, kidnapping and murder charges. Rusesabagina's supporters say he is innocent and that the move is retaliation against the former "hero" for his public criticism of President Paul Kagame, who has ruled the country with a strong hand since ending the civil war in the mid 1990s.

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Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

It's UNGA week, very unusual New York to have the United Nations General Assembly meetings. You know, the city is locked down. It's almost always locked down this week, but usually you can't get anywhere because you've got all these marshals with dozens of heads of state and well over a hundred foreign ministers and their delegations jamming literally everything, Midtown and branching out across the city. This time around, the security cordon for the United Nations itself is barely a block, and no one is flying in. I mean, the weather is gorgeous, and you can walk pretty much anywhere, but nothing's really locked down aside from, of course, the fact that the restaurants and the bars and the theaters and everything else is not happening given the pandemic. And it's not just in the US, it's all around the world.

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Listen: Have you ever heard of Blue Zones? They're communities all around the globe—from Sardinia to Okinawa to Loma Linda, CA—where residents exceed the average human lifespan by years, and even decades. While they've been studied for the lessons we can learn about health, lifestyle, and environment, you don't have to live in a Blue Zone to experience increased longevity. It's happening everywhere. In fact, the number of people over 80 is expected to triple by 2050, reaching nearly half a billion. This episode of Living Beyond Borders focuses on the geopolitical and economic implications of an aging global population, how to make the most of new chapters in your life as you age, and what it all means for your money and the world around you.

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Born in the ashes of World War II, the United Nations now marks its 75th anniversary amid another global crisis. But is the world ready to come together today as it did decades ago? Ian Bremmer offers a brief history of the organization, and some memorable moments from years gone by, as the UN's 193 member states gather virtually for the 2020 General Assembly.

Watch the episode: UN Secretary-General António Guterres: Why we still need the United Nations


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