Here's You Eggnog Snorkel: What You Missed Over the Holidays

Here's You Eggnog Snorkel: What You Missed Over the Holidays

While you were celebrating the holidays, we kept track of the last few stories from 2017 that will cast a shadow into this year.


News from one big country that’s not celebrating the New Year (yet)

Well it’s not New Year’s in Iran — Nowruz isn’t for another three months — but thousands of Iranians are on the streets in a dozen cities. These are the largest protests the country has seen since 2009. Social media have been blocked and as of this writing, more than 20 are dead. Here are a few key questions answered:

First, what are they protesting about? The initial demonstrations have focused on economic issues and corruption — unemployment is above 12%, youth unemployment is more than twice that, and food prices recently soared. Most of the economic gains from the opening that resulted from the Iran nuclear deal have gone to the oil sector, leaving ordinary Iranians no better off. As the protests have grown, some participants are taking direct aim at the political system, the clerical establishment, and Iran’s foreign policy.

Second, how do they compare to past protests? In 2009, more than a million people turned out, mainly in the capital, Tehran, to demand a recount after a fraudulent election. Those protests were led by prominent reformist figures within the governing establishment. The current protests, by contrast, are much smaller, more decentralized, and lacking in clear demands — but they are also more spontaneous and widespread throughout the country. One amazing statistic: in 2009 there were 1 million smartphones in Iran — today there are more than 48 million.

Third, who benefits? It remains to be seen whether these protests will helpthe cause of moderates like President Hassan Rouhani, who want to reform the economy further, or hardliners who are skeptical of the Iran deal and keen to point out its economic shortcomings.

Or, a more interesting possibility altogether: could these decentralized, leaderless protests spin beyond the “reformist vs hardliner” parameters of the Iranian political spectrum altogether, and pose a new kind of challenge to the clerics who have run the country for almost four decades?

Kim Jong-un: the olive branch and the nuclear button

North Korean Dear Leader Kim Jong-un’s New Years’ address included an unusual appeal for fresh talks with South Korea. But Kim also warned Washington that the entire US is, he says, within range of his arsenal and that the “nuclear button is still on [his] desk.” Kim may be trying to drive a wedgebetween the US, which has threatened military strikes to stop Kim’s nuclear program — spoiler alert: Kim won’t give up his nukes — and South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who was elected last year in part on his pledge to improve relations with the North.

Italy dissolved its parliament ahead of March election

The move officially opened the campaign season for an election that could be pivotal for Italy and for Europe. If the anti-EU Five Star movement performs well — a distinct possibility — it would raise existential questions for the EU about Italy’s continued commitment to membership. Even if Five Star doesn’t get enough votes to form a government, Italy’s next governing coalition will almost certainly be an unstable and fragmented one.

ISIS killed dozens at a Shia cultural center in Kabul

ISIS has shown resilience in Afghanistan even after Trump dropped the “Mother of All Bombs” and sent more troops there last year. The Islamic State lost its strongholds in Syria and Iraq in 2017, but it’s been methodically setting up shop in other weak, conflict-riddled states like Afghanistan, Yemen, Somalia, and Libya. That will be a big story this year.

Saudi Arabia’s War against Iranian-backed rebels in Yemen reached the 1,000-day mark

The war, a stalemate that has fomented one of the world’s worst humanitarian disasters, is the brainchild of recently-elevated Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. As he prepares to take power — potentially this year — Prince Mohammed has to find a way out of a strategic quagmire without looking like he’s caving to Tehran.

Retirement planning interlude: what a way to go out

Perks for Zimbabwe’s ousted former President Robert Mugabe include some two-dozen permanent staff, three new cars every five years, and a newly built eight-bedroom residence or its equivalent in cash, according to a notice issued by the country’s new leader. Call your financial planner right now and make demands.

Democracy is Weah it’s at: a Liberian bright spot

Not long ago we wrote about the challenges to democracy globally, as support for authoritarianism grows. But the clean election of former star footballer George Weah as president of Liberia is a bright spot — it’s the first time the war-ravaged country has seen a peaceful transfer of power since 1944. Now comes the hard part — translating star power into sound governance so that democracy is seen as effective.

That's Bank of America's new target in its Environmental Business Initiative in order to accelerate the transition to a low-carbon, sustainable economy.

Here's how it will drive innovation to address climate change.

On Tuesday, a major US intelligence report said the top threat to America right now is China. A day later, John Kerry, the Biden administration's "climate czar," got on a plane to... China.

Such is the drama of ties between the world's two largest economies these days.

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Should the Biden administration "reverse course on China" in the hope of establishing a friendlier relationship, as diplomat Kishore Mahbubani argues in a recent Financial Times op-ed? Ian Bremmer and Eurasia Group analyst Michael Hirson take out the Red Pen to explain why it's not that simple.

And today, we are talking about the United States and China. The relationship between the two most powerful nations in the world is the worst it's been since the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989. Pundits and policymakers alike all around the world are trying to figure out how Washington and Beijing can at least stop the bleeding because a reset is nowhere in the cards.

That's the topic of the op-ed that we are looking at today. It's from the Financial Times, written by Singaporean diplomat Kishore Mahbubani, and the title summarizes the key argument: "Biden should summon the courage to reverse course on China." Meaning, he should throw out the Trump era approach and open the door to more cooperation and kinder, gentler relations.

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More than a dozen COVID-19 vaccines have been fully approved or are currently in early use globally, and COVAX, the global initiative started last year by the World Health Organization and other partners, is pushing for equitable access to vaccines for all. But most of the half billion jabs given so far have gone to citizens of wealthy countries, with half going to the US and China alone. What's the problem with so-called vaccine nationalism? Ian Bremmer explains that besides the clear humanitarian concerns, the continued global spread of COVID increases the risk of new mutations and variants that can threaten the entire world, vaccinated or not.

Watch the episode: Vaccine nationalism could prolong the pandemic

Should wealthy individuals and nations shoulder more of the burden in addressing climate change? Pulitzer Prize-winning climate journalist Elizabeth Kolbert argues that Big Tech leaders like Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk should shift more of their focus to fighting for our own planet's survival, instead of space exploration. "We're doing as much as we can to make life difficult on planet Earth for ourselves. But there's virtually nothing we could do to make it as difficult as life on Mars, where there's, among other things, no oxygen." Kolbert, the author of Under a White Sky, discusses why it's so crucial for a few rich countries to bear most of the climate burden, since they're also the biggest emitters. Her conversation with Ian Bremmer is featured in the upcoming episode of GZERO World, airing on US public television stations starting this Friday, April 16. Check local listings.

In recent days, Northern Ireland has seen some of its worst street violence in over a decade. The anger has subsided a bit this week, but post-Brexit fears leave many uncertain about their future in a deeply divided land with a long history of political violence between Irish republicans and UK unionists.

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Fighting climate change is about making the planet get less hot. The more quickly countries slow down their carbon emissions, the faster that'll happen. All the more important for the nations that pollute the most — but not all of them are on board. Although the majority, including China, are setting future targets to go Net Zero, India doesn't want to commit (yet) to when to stop burning fossil fuels to spur economic growth. We take a look at when the world's top polluting economies intend to go carbon-neutral, compared with their share of global emissions, of renewable energy as a source of electricity, and percentage of global coal consumption.

Peruvian runoff: Perú's presidential election is going to a runoff in June between two surprise and polarizing contenders, each of whom won less than 20 percent of votes in a highly fragmented first round. Pedro Castillo, a far-left union leader and teacher who benefited from a late surge in the polls, will battle rightwing populist Keiko Fujimori, daughter of the country's imprisoned former strongman. Castillo wants to rewrite the constitution to weaken the political influence of the country's business elite and maybe to allow the state to nationalize parts of the mining sector to pay for social programs for the poor. Fujimori wants to use mining revenues to create jobs by investing in infrastructure and healthcare. The runoff will probably be a national referendum on Fujimori, a divisive figure running for the top job for the third time. No Peruvian president has ever left office without facing corruption charges, but Fujimori already faces several — and she'll avoid jail time if she wins.

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