Here's You Eggnog Snorkel: What You Missed Over the Holidays

Here's You Eggnog Snorkel: What You Missed Over the Holidays

While you were celebrating the holidays, we kept track of the last few stories from 2017 that will cast a shadow into this year.


News from one big country that’s not celebrating the New Year (yet)

Well it’s not New Year’s in Iran — Nowruz isn’t for another three months — but thousands of Iranians are on the streets in a dozen cities. These are the largest protests the country has seen since 2009. Social media have been blocked and as of this writing, more than 20 are dead. Here are a few key questions answered:

First, what are they protesting about? The initial demonstrations have focused on economic issues and corruption — unemployment is above 12%, youth unemployment is more than twice that, and food prices recently soared. Most of the economic gains from the opening that resulted from the Iran nuclear deal have gone to the oil sector, leaving ordinary Iranians no better off. As the protests have grown, some participants are taking direct aim at the political system, the clerical establishment, and Iran’s foreign policy.

Second, how do they compare to past protests? In 2009, more than a million people turned out, mainly in the capital, Tehran, to demand a recount after a fraudulent election. Those protests were led by prominent reformist figures within the governing establishment. The current protests, by contrast, are much smaller, more decentralized, and lacking in clear demands — but they are also more spontaneous and widespread throughout the country. One amazing statistic: in 2009 there were 1 million smartphones in Iran — today there are more than 48 million.

Third, who benefits? It remains to be seen whether these protests will helpthe cause of moderates like President Hassan Rouhani, who want to reform the economy further, or hardliners who are skeptical of the Iran deal and keen to point out its economic shortcomings.

Or, a more interesting possibility altogether: could these decentralized, leaderless protests spin beyond the “reformist vs hardliner” parameters of the Iranian political spectrum altogether, and pose a new kind of challenge to the clerics who have run the country for almost four decades?

Kim Jong-un: the olive branch and the nuclear button

North Korean Dear Leader Kim Jong-un’s New Years’ address included an unusual appeal for fresh talks with South Korea. But Kim also warned Washington that the entire US is, he says, within range of his arsenal and that the “nuclear button is still on [his] desk.” Kim may be trying to drive a wedgebetween the US, which has threatened military strikes to stop Kim’s nuclear program — spoiler alert: Kim won’t give up his nukes — and South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who was elected last year in part on his pledge to improve relations with the North.

Italy dissolved its parliament ahead of March election

The move officially opened the campaign season for an election that could be pivotal for Italy and for Europe. If the anti-EU Five Star movement performs well — a distinct possibility — it would raise existential questions for the EU about Italy’s continued commitment to membership. Even if Five Star doesn’t get enough votes to form a government, Italy’s next governing coalition will almost certainly be an unstable and fragmented one.

ISIS killed dozens at a Shia cultural center in Kabul

ISIS has shown resilience in Afghanistan even after Trump dropped the “Mother of All Bombs” and sent more troops there last year. The Islamic State lost its strongholds in Syria and Iraq in 2017, but it’s been methodically setting up shop in other weak, conflict-riddled states like Afghanistan, Yemen, Somalia, and Libya. That will be a big story this year.

Saudi Arabia’s War against Iranian-backed rebels in Yemen reached the 1,000-day mark

The war, a stalemate that has fomented one of the world’s worst humanitarian disasters, is the brainchild of recently-elevated Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. As he prepares to take power — potentially this year — Prince Mohammed has to find a way out of a strategic quagmire without looking like he’s caving to Tehran.

Retirement planning interlude: what a way to go out

Perks for Zimbabwe’s ousted former President Robert Mugabe include some two-dozen permanent staff, three new cars every five years, and a newly built eight-bedroom residence or its equivalent in cash, according to a notice issued by the country’s new leader. Call your financial planner right now and make demands.

Democracy is Weah it’s at: a Liberian bright spot

Not long ago we wrote about the challenges to democracy globally, as support for authoritarianism grows. But the clean election of former star footballer George Weah as president of Liberia is a bright spot — it’s the first time the war-ravaged country has seen a peaceful transfer of power since 1944. Now comes the hard part — translating star power into sound governance so that democracy is seen as effective.

This time last year, world health experts were speculating about why Africa appeared to have escaped the worst of the global pandemic. Younger populations? Natural immunity created by exposure to past viruses? Something else?

They can stop wondering. Africa is now in the grip of a COVID emergency.

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Listen: Stanford historian Niall Ferguson joins Ian Bremmer on the GZERO World podcast to talk about the geopolitics of disaster. Throughout human history we seem to be unable to adequately prepare for catastrophes (natural or human-caused) before they strike. Why is that? And as we emerge from the greatest calamity of our lifetimes in the COVID-19 pandemic and look to the plethora of crises that climate change has and will cause, what can we do to lessen the blow?

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

Get insights on the latest news in US politics from Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington:

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi barred two Republican members from serving on the Jan. 6 commission. What's going on?

Well, the Jan. 6 commission was designed to be a bipartisan commission, taking input from members from Democrats and Republicans. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy had the opportunity to make recommendations but the Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, could always veto those recommendations. In this case, she did, saying no to two members, Jim Banks and Jim Jordan, both of whom are strongly aligned with President Trump and who voted against certifying the election results in 2020. The Republicans for the most part see the Jan. 6 commission as an opportunity to score political points against them, and the Democrats say this is going to be a fair, non-biased, and nonpartisan investigation into what happened on Jan. 6, starting with a hearing next week with some of the police officers who were involved in the battle with the protesters inside the Capitol.

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In his New York Times op-ed, David Brooks says the US is facing an identity crisis — protecting liberal and progressive values at home while doing little to stop autocrats elsewhere. But has the US really abandoned its values abroad just because it's withdrawing from Afghanistan? Ian Bremmer and Eurasia Group analyst Charles Dunst take out the Red Pen to argue that the US can advance democracy without being the world's sheriff.

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When the Tokyo Olympics begin on Friday, Japan watchers will be following more than just the performance of Japan's star athletes, including tennis star Naomi Osaka. They will also be tracking the political fortunes of Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, who is taking a big gamble by staging the event — amid a raging pandemic — in the face of strong and longstanding opposition from the Japanese public. What are the stakes for Suga, particularly with elections on the horizon? Eurasia Group senior analyst Ali Wyne explains.

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YouTube pulls Bolsonaro's rants: Google-owned YouTube pulled down a series of videos on the channel of Brazil's populist President Jair Bolsonaro, accusing him of spreading misinformation about the pandemic. YouTube removed more than a dozen clips for touting quack cures for coronavirus or claiming, in defiance of scientific experts, that masks don't reduce COVID transmissions. Last year, Twitter and Facebook also removed some content from Bolsonaro's feeds for similar reasons. But critics say that YouTube's move is too little too late, because Bolsonaro has been spreading misinformation about COVID since the pandemic began. Many Brazilians hold him personally responsible for the country's abysmal pandemic response, which has led to almost 550,000 deaths, the second worst toll in the world. Will YouTube's move change Bolsonaro's message? His weekly address to the nation, where he converses not only with government ministers but also various conspiracy theorists and loons, is broadcast on YouTube. Surely he doesn't want to risk losing that — or does he?

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Boycotts! Bans! Protests! Drugs! Think you've got gold medal knowledge about politics at the Olympics? Test what you know with this special Tokyo Olympics Quiz. And to stay current on all the latest political stories at the Games and around the world, subscribe here to Signal, our daily newsletter. Now, without further ado, the first question is...

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