Jupiter Rising?

Speaking of fresh claims to global power, French President Emmanuel Macron, arriving in China this week for a three-day visit, snapped off a telling tweet — “I’m here to tell you,” he wrote in French, “Europe is back.” While Macron’s ambitious domestic agenda has gotten a lot of attention, the French president is also trying to cast himself as the leader of a more energetic European foreign policy.


Three things are working in his favor: Brexit has galvanized greater security cooperation on the continent. Germany is focused inward as it struggles to form a new government after last year’s election. And Donald Trump’s “America First” foreign policy has opened up a leadership void internationally.

How’s young Jupiter doing? His biggest win to date has been on climate change policy, where last month he convened more than 50 heads of state to reaffirm their commitment to the Paris climate deal. With his trip this week, Macron hopes to forge a unified European position on trade with China.

A vast majority of the French public (73%) like how he represents France abroad. But insofar as Macron is committed to revival and renewal of the European project, his foreign policy ambitions largely depend on an older question about whether a Europe of nearly thirty countries can ever have a unified global voice. To make that happen, Europe’s ambitious new soloist will have to learn how to play the role of conductor. We’re here to tell you: watch this space.

Earlier this year, two powerful cyclones struck the northern coast of Mozambique and were followed by months of torrential rain. Mozambique faced an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. "The coast road from Pemba airport to the city center and its harbor was totally destroyed," said Franco Picciani, operations manager at Eni Rovuma Basin. The damage brought the city's economy to a standstill.

Eni answered the call, providing its equipment and expertise. "We rebuilt the coast road in less than two months," Picciani said. "We work in the area. We have a logistics base here. It's home to us. When the area needed help, we didn't stop to think about it for a minute. It goes without saying that we should look after the community we work in."

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

Six months after pro-democracy Hong Kong protesters began marching against an extradition law that would have allowed suspects to be tried in mainland courts, things in the semi-autonomous territory feel on the brink. The question is, the brink of what?

Rather than a sudden break that resolves the crisis one way or another – either a government capitulation or crackdown by Beijing – Hong Kong may instead be facing a prolonged, violent, and costly stalemate. Here's why:

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Why do journalists keep sources anonymous?

So, anonymity can be granted for a number of reasons. The main one is a risk of retaliation against the person, against their job, against their personal safety. For instance, if you report in a war zone or on a crime victim. It can also be to protect vulnerable people such as children, or if it's just the only way to get the information out.

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Latin America's longest-serving head of state is now out. Bolivia's fiery leftwing President Evo Morales resigned on Sunday, after weeks of increasingly violent protests over his apparent bid to rig last month's presidential elections.

Although he agreed under international pressure to hold a fresh ballot, he and his vice president were ousted by the military after a number of local police units sided with demonstrators.

His supporters say this is an illegal coup that undermines democracy. His opponents say Morales' attempt to rig the election was the real assault on democracy and that the army has merely stepped in to restore order so that elections can be held.

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