Silver linings & business learnings from the coronavirus crisis

What silver linings, if any, are there from the dreadful pandemic which we've all been experiencing?

This has been a humanitarian disaster. And therefore, it's a little incongruous to talk about silver linings, but there are a few. First off, we've all learned how to work digitally and what that means for our businesses. There's a new appreciation of how to take processes and make them more efficient using digital and other techniques. How to serve customers through a contact free environment and how to make a difference every day by staying in touch through digital means. The second silver lining may actually be around the way decisions themselves get made. The piece. The ability to bring together the bare facts necessary in order to make a decision and no longer agonizing over a lot of superfluous information that makes no difference, but actually just adds to bureaucracy and takes time. The third is indeed waste. Because we've all been under so much pressure and we've be working remotely, there's a renewed appreciation for what matters. What is it in the business that we need to do and do really well? And what is it we don't?


So, three ways in which there is an opportunity to extract a silver lining from this dreadful crisis. Make more use of digital. Speed up decision making. Get rid of waste. I hope those are some of the things that you can take with me as we journey together into the next normal.

The goal of Eni's High Performance Computing is to perfect and industrialize low carbon energy technologies developed in collaboration with research centers. Eni's efforts are helping to generate energy from waves and guarantee access to energy in remote areas thanks to light-weight and flexible organic photovoltaic panels


Watch Eni's new docuseries on HPC5

Facing the biggest economic crisis in the EU's history, the European Commission's president, Ursula von der Leyen, pulled out all the stops this week, unveiling an unprecedented plan to boost the union's post-coronavirus recovery.

The plan: The EU would go to international capital markets to raise 750 billion euros ($830 billion). 500 billion of that would be given to member states as grants to fund economic recovery over the next seven years; the remainder would be issued as loans to be paid back to Brussels. The EU would pay back its bondholders for the full 750 billion plus interest by 2058, in part by raising new EU-wide taxes on tech companies and emissions.

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Watch GZERO World as host Ian Bremmer talks to acclaimed foreign policy expert Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations and author of "The World: A Brief Introduction." Haass explains that while the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted every aspect of life as we know it, the major issues confronting geopolitics in the 21st Century already existed.

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