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South African president Cyril Ramaphosa casts his vote during the South African elections in Soweto, South Africa May 29, 2024

REUTERS/Oupa Nkosi

Can the ANC make new friends and keep the old (president)?

For the first time in 30 years, South Africa’s African National Congress failed to win a majority in this month’s election, forcing it to turn to opposition parties in hopes of forming a coalition.

The most likely option now seems to be a multiparty coalition, similar to Nelson Mandela’s post-apartheid transitional government. This would allow the ANC to maintain its power by partnering with smaller, less established parties and, notably, the Economic Freedom Fighters, which underperformed in the election. According to Eurasia Group analyst Ziyanda Stuurman, this government is most favorable to the ANC as it would “keep Cyril Ramaphosa as president and provide at least some stability across the political landscape.”

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Trump trial: How would a conviction hurt his reelection bid?
| World In :60

Trump trial: How would a conviction hurt his reelection bid?

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

How would a conviction in his hush money trial impact Trump in the 2024 election?

At least a little bit at the margins. And certainly that's the reason why Biden and the White House campaign are now working to pay attention to it, to get people down there in front of the courthouse where the media is located and talk about Trump as a criminal. Of course, could backfire on them, especially if it's a hung jury. But if he's convicted, while Republicans aren't going anywhere, there are a lot of independents that have consistently said that they are less willing to vote for Trump. Of course, this conviction comes in the lowest stake of the cases that are being presently pursued against the former president. This isn't the case on the insurrection and this isn't the case even on the classified documents being obscured, mishandled. And so as a consequence, I suspect at the end of the day, if you get a conviction, it's not going to matter much. But in a very, very close election, which is all about swing states and turnouts, it could hurt with getting independents to turn out for Trump.

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President Joe Biden speaks to the press before boarding Air Force One at Hagerstown Regional Airport in Hagerstown, Maryland, on March 5, 2024.

REUTERS/Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/File Photo

State of the Elephant downstairs

US President Joe Biden takes the podium tonight for his annual State of the Union address to Congress. Ahead of what will almost certainly be an epic electoral rematch against Donald Trump this fall, this SOTU is, basically, a campaign speech.
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After Super Tuesday, US elections inch closer to Biden vs. Trump redux
US elections: Biden vs. Trump redux? | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

After Super Tuesday, US elections inch closer to Biden vs. Trump redux

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

Any surprises from Super Tuesday

Yeah, I was surprised that Nikki Haley got Vermont. Honestly, I thought that she'd get swept by Trump. Though Vermont is a tiny, tiny little state. It still counts, but she's still out. She's, of course, suspended her campaign and that is not a surprise. And Biden beat undecided and Dean Phillips, who is basically the equivalent of undecided, pretty decisively in all of his states. So, yes, unless something happens health-wise to either of the candidates over the next months, it is Biden, and it is Trump, and that is it. And we've known that for a good long while now. It doesn't feel so super. It's not what everybody wants, but we still have months and months and months in the world's longest and most expensive election in the world. Yet one more reason why the United States is the most powerful and super dysfunctional democracy.

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Annie Gugliotta

2024: The year of elections

Buckle up for the most intense year of democracy the world has ever seen.

With at least 65 countries holding elections, 4.2 billion people – about half of the world's adult population – will have the chance to vote in 2024. Saying the world could shift on its axis this year is an understatement.

We break down the most consequential elections in 2024 below:

Bangladesh / Finland / Ghana / India / Indonesia / Iran / Jordan / Lithuania / Mexico / Mozambique / Namibia / Pakistan / Panama / Romania / Russia / Rwanda / Senegal / Solomon Islands / Somaliland / South Africa / South Korea / South Sudan / Taiwan / Tunisia / United Kingdom / United States / Uruguay / Venezuela / European Union Parliament

Plus, couple big "maybes": Israel and Ukraine

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AI vs. truth: Battling deepfakes amid 2024 elections
AI vs. truth: Battling deepfakes amid 2024 elections | Eva Maydell | Global Stage

AI vs. truth: Battling deepfakes amid 2024 elections

With nearly half of the globe heading to the polls this year amid lightning-speed developments in generative AI, fears are running rampant over tech-driven disinformation campaigns.

During a Global Stage panel at the Munich Security Conference, Bulgarian politician and European Parliament member Eva Maydell said she fears we will soon be unable to separate fact from deepfake fiction.

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Paige Fusco

Graphic Truth: Why are American elections so long?

Former President Donald Trump was the first major candidate to launch his campaign for the 2024 presidential election cycle – on Nov. 15, 2022, roughly two years before Election Day. The US puts no limits on the length of campaigns, which leaves the door open for massive amounts of campaign spending and has the potential to leave voters exhausted by the time they head to the polls.

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President of South Africa, Cyril Ramaphosa attends the second day of the 37th Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the African Union at the African Union.

REUTERS/Stringer

South Africa to hold May elections

South Africa’s President Cyril Ramaphosa announced that his country will hold a general election on May 29. Ramaphosa’s party, the African National Congress, is at risk of losing its parliamentary majority after ruling since post-Apartheid elections began in 1994.
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