China's outrage against Swiss bankers – Paul Donovan, an economist at UBS and a former colleague of your Wednesday Signal author, ended up in hot water last week after he wrote that an outbreak of swine fever that had pushed up pork prices in China, "matters if you are a Chinese pig. It matters if you like eating pork in China. It does not really matter to the rest of the world." The Swiss bank put Donovan on leave after a nationalist tabloid picked up the story, unleashing a torrent of invective from angry Chinese citizens, industry groups, and clients. Although we're a bit puzzled at the intensity of the outrage, we're following this story closely. The anger of 1.4 billion people is a powerful thing, and if the US-China standoff over tech and trade continues to escalate, US firms could soon find themselves on the receiving end.

What we are ignoring: Trump on ICE

Trump's Deportation Threats – As Donald Trump revved up his official reelection campaign in Florida on Tuesday, he took to Twitter to vow mass deportations of "millions of illegal aliens" starting next week. We are ignoring this for two reasons: First, it looks more like a campaign trail stunt than a well-thought-out plan — the scale of deportations Trump envisions would require massive logistical coordination, and it's not clear that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) can deliver it — even if the federal force got help from local police, who may be reluctant to participate in mass arrests in their communities. Second, while this type of rhetoric may play directly to Trump's base, images of crying children torn from their parents will galvanize the president's opponents — and, in particular, the suburban women crucial to his 2016 victory. We're not ignoring the pain and trauma that mass deportations would inflict on immigrant communities if Trump delivers on this threat. We're ignoring a boast that's likely to prove a political bust.

9.7 billion: A new UN Population Division report projects that the global population will hit 9.7 billion by 2050, up from the current 7.7 billion. Most of that population growth will come from sub-Saharan Africa, which is expected to add another billion people over the next three decades.

13.3 trillion: In other projections to the year 2050, energy trackers at BloombergNEF estimate that the 62% increase in electricity demand over the next three decades will bring in $13.3 trillion in new investments, with $5.3 trillion going to wind and $4.2 trillion to solar. That's a lot of power but sweeping policy changes will still be needed to hit global climate targets.

9,000: Bitcoin, the world's original cryptocurrency, surged past $9,000 this week to a 13-month high following the news of Facebook's plan to launch its own digital currency and payment system. The prospect of the world's biggest social network moving into the crypto space has seemingly legitimized an industry that's been struggling with growth problems, fraud, and volatile prices.

1,232: Local authorities in Berlin this week approved a plan to freeze rent hikes in the city for the next five years as the German capital has become a major destination for European job seekers. Currently, the average monthly rent in Berlin is about $1,232, a 7% jump over the first three months of this year.

Can President Trump bring the Iranians to the negotiating table?

Well certainly better than John Bolton can. Trump is the guy that said that actually it wasn't such a big deal that these two tankers were hit. He's more concerned about the nuclear issue. He would like the Iranians to talk. The Iranians, meanwhile, have to show a little bit of strength before they'd be willing to negotiate. And still they're under a lot of pressure. I think it's possible that they'll start talking but not until they get out of the nuclear deal - they break through the new uranium enrichment.

Is Hong Kong a big thorn in President Xi's side?

No question and the timing is horrible. I mean 2 million people demonstrating making the Chinese government back down on this extradition law and now they've got the G20 meeting and are they going to negotiate or not with President Trump? Harder for the Chinese to look in any way weak or take risks with the Americans because of what's happening right now in Hong Kong. But keep in mind, mainland Chinese are not really aware of these demonstrations.

Will Mohammed Morsi's death lead to protests in Egypt?

On balance, no. But it'll probably lead to more terrorism from Islamic extremists and I think that is the danger. This guy was not given appropriate medical treatment while he was being held and now in court he's dead and there's no question that a lot of his supporters who themselves have been on the more extreme side are really going to be unhappy. So I'd watch out for that.

"Seeing dead bodies on the street was a part of everyday life." Growing up in North Korea, Yeonmi Park says she survived the great famine of the 1990s by foraging for grasshoppers and dragonflies. Today she is a human rights activist living in Chicago. How she got from there to here is the story of a lifetime. And it's the subject of this special edition of GZERO World.

Over the past thirty odd years, more than a billion people have left poverty, in what is one of the most extraordinary periods of economic and human development in history. Here is a look at the large countries — those with 50m people or more — that lifted the greatest number of their people out of poverty since the early 1990s.

Is there turmoil in the Trump reelection campaign?

Well there's turmoil among Trump's pollsters. Some internal numbers leaked out showing the president doing very badly in battleground states. Trump denied them and then fired a bunch of the pollsters. So yeah a little turmoil there.

Is Mick Mulvaney on thin-ice with President Trump?

I don't think he is. Trump clearly doesn't like it when Mulvaney coughs during interviews as we saw in the ABC piece. But Mulvaney is well-liked in the White House and by Trump. So I think he's OK.

Which Democrats are getting the most support from Wall Street?

It's really a top three there. Joe Biden is the number one pick. He's fairly moderate and people think he can win. The other two: Kamala Harris and Pete Buttigieg are gaining a lot of Wall Street support.

And finally for The Rant: my rant this week is about Art Laffer, a conservative economist who's going to get the Presidential Medal of Freedom this week. Last week he blamed President Obama for the Great Recession, which is one of the more ridiculous things I've ever heard. That recession obviously started well before Obama, it was the financial crisis, the collapse of the mortgage market and the near failure of the banking system - to blame Obama is absurd.

"Seeing dead bodies on the street was a part of everyday life." Growing up in North Korea, Yeonmi Park says she survived the great famine of the 1990s by foraging for grasshoppers and dragonflies. Today she is a human rights activist living in Chicago. How she got from there to here is the story of a lifetime. And it's the subject of this special edition of GZERO World.

"Seeing dead bodies on the street was a part of everyday life." Growing up in rural North Korea, Yeonmi Park survived the great famine of the 1990s by foraging for grasshoppers and dragonflies. Today she is a human rights activist living in Chicago. How she got from there to here is the story of a lifetime. And it's the subject of this special edition of GZERO World.