What were the reasons behind the rise of the Vox Party in the Spanish general election?

I think it was basically the question of Catalonia, the unity of the Spanish nations. And VOX played very hard on that particular issue and it was eating into the support of the other center-right forces there. So, it has now established itself fairly firmly on the Spanish political scene with the consequences that that will have.

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The fight for the Nile: In recent days, the Trump administration has tried to mediate three-way talks between Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia on their long-running dispute to access the waters of the Nile. In short, a 1929 treaty gave Egypt and Sudan rights to nearly all Nile waters and the right to veto any attempt by upstream countries to claim a greater share. But in 2011, Ethiopia began work on the so-called Grand Renaissance Dam on the Blue Nile tributary from where 85 percent of the Nile's waters flow. The project, due for completion next year, will be Africa's largest hydroelectric power plant. Egypt, which draws 85 percent of its water from the Nile, has made threats that raised fears of military action. We're watching as this conflict finally comes to a head early next year.

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13: More than 13 percent of US adults, 34 million people, report having a friend or family member who has died in the past five years because they couldn't afford medical treatment, according to a new Gallup poll. Polls show that voters consider healthcare a high-priority issue in next year's US elections.

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William Hague: What's my prediction for the outcome of the election?

Well, we know we can't predict elections, of course, from my last few years in Britain or America. And this election could be like the last British election where the Labor Party really close the gap in the last three weeks. We've got four weeks to go. But on the whole, I think it probably won't be like that. That's because people do want to now resolve the Brexit situation. Most people in the country do. I think the conservatives will run a much better campaign than last time and they have done so far. Jeremy Corbyn isn't the novelty that he was at the last election, and people have decided they don't like him. And the Brexit party has pulled out half its candidates and that helps the conservatives more than Labour. So, at this point, I would predict a small conservative majority. And that would mean Brexit happens, 31st of January, 2020.

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Clerical Errors


The Catholic Church is facing tremendous internal upheaval and Pope Francis is at the center of it. Our guest is a Jesuit priest who recently had a private audience with the Pontiff, and who has courted plenty of controversy of his own. In a candid conversation with Ian Bremmer, bestselling author Fr. James Martin discusses the moment of potential schism the Church is facing. On issues like LGBT inclusion, immigration, and income inequality, Pope Francis has moved the Church into a more progressive place, one that traditionalists and conservatives oppose. Meanwhile, the scandals continue to take a toll on Church membership and credibility. Fr. Martin frankly and honestly addresses all these issues and more.


When President Trump decided to officially withdraw American troops from Kurdish-controlled Syria, many people, including some in his own administration, were shocked. But the Kurds, themselves? Today's guest says, "Not so much." In this episode, Ian Bremmer breaks down the long and tragic history of the Kurdish people, the group's geopolitical significance in the region and beyond, and the many times the U.S. has left this ally stranded politically or militarily. This show also contains a field interview with NYC pizza magnate Hakki Akdeniz, a Kurdish immigrant who came to the U.S. broke and homeless. He now has a booming business, more than 3 million Instagram followers, and he's giving back by feeding homeless people on the city streets.




Seventy-five years after the end of World War II, right-wing extremism is again on the rise in Germany. Ian Bremmer sits down with the country's former Defense Minister, Karl Theodor zu Guttenberg, to understand the reasons why and road ahead for Germany and Europe. The two discuss the increasing popularity of the far-right political party AfD, the nation's place in Europe and the world, mounting disapproval of the German governments refugee policies and Angela Merkel's legacy.