What happens to the Kurds now that the U.S. has left Syria?

What happens to the Kurds now that the U.S. has left Syria?


Well I mean, first the U.S. hasn't left Syria. We're talking about 50 to 100 Special Forces in a border area compared to a thousand American troops on the ground in Syria. The tweet is so much bigger than the reality. Now the Kurds are gonna be deeply annoyed because they've been fighting with the Americans, for the Americans, against ISIS and now they're increasingly gonna be aligned with the Russians and Assad because they don't trust the U.S. But frankly, they were kind of expecting this to come. And the Turks coming in are not going to blow up all of the Kurds. They don't want a big war on the ground. The reality is that Syria moves much more slowly than Trump tweets about it.



Can you explain what's going on with the NBA in China?


Yeah, the NBA makes a lot of money in China. And so, even though Commissioner Silver said last year "it's very important to stand for something," the thing that's most important to stand for is the Chinese market and all the cash that you can make there. So, when your general manager of the Houston Rockets - We like the Rockets. They got James Harden. He's filthy in the way he plays, right? - But the GM is not so filthy. He just says "I want to support the Hong Kong demonstrators." They have to take it down. Everyone apologizes. The Chinese apology is even worse, more embarrassing than the English language apology. And then the head of the Nets, the owner, actually gives like this two-page propagandistic screed saying that "Hong Kong's all secessionist you should oppose and it's a third rail." The NBA doesn't take that down. Oh, what a mess for the NBA. They're not gonna be back in China anytime soon. They're take an economic hit. And meanwhile, the Americans are kind of cheesed off. Except the Americans don't care about politics. That is, most Americans, so maybe they're okay. Anyway, not you guys. You watch this stuff. See you next week.

Imagine losing your child in their first year of life and having no idea what caused it. This is the heartbreaking reality for thousands of families each year who lose a child to Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID). Despite decades-long efforts to prevent SUID, it remains the leading cause of death for children between one month and one year of age in developed nations. Working in collaboration with researchers at Seattle Children's Research Institute and the University of Auckland, Microsoft analyzed the Center for Disease Control (CDC) data on every child born in the U.S. over a decade, including over 41 million births and 37,000 SUID deaths.

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Read more at Microsoft On The Issues.

A job is a job right? Not really. Full-time work generally offers more stability and financial security than part time jobs. Those full-time jobs tend to be more accessible in richer countries, but in every part of the world, regardless of a country's economic output, there is still a wide gap between the full-time employment of men and women. Globally, 36 percent of men are secure in a full time job, compared to just 21 percent of women. Here's a look at how each region fares.

After a months-long investigation into whether President Donald Trump pressured Ukraine's president into investigating his political rivals in order to boost his reelection prospects in 2020, House Democrats brought two articles of impeachment against him, charging him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Click here for our GZERO guide to what comes next.

In the meantime, imagine for a moment that you are now Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority leader and senior member of Donald Trump's Republican Party. You've got big choices to make.

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After a months-long investigation into whether President Donald Trump pressured Ukraine's president into investigating his political rivals in order to boost his reelection prospects in 2020, House Democrats on Tuesday brought two articles of impeachment against him. They charge Trump with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

So, what are the next steps?

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Trump gets his deal – House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced yesterday that Democrats will back the USMCA, the US-Mexico-Canada trade agreement that will replace the North American Free Trade Agreement. Crucially, the bill will also have support from the nation's largest labor union. This is a major political victory for President Trump, who promised he would close this deal, but it's also good for Pelosi: it shows that the Democrats' House majority can still accomplish big things even as it impeaches the president. But with the speed of the Washington news cycle these days, we're watching to see if anyone is still talking about USMCA three days after it's signed.

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