What We're Watching: Pride on Parade

Pride — Half a century ago today, patrons of the Stonewall Inn, a haven for people of all sexual orientations, fought back against the New York City cops who had been rousting and bullying them for years. And in recent weeks, members of the LGBT community and others around the world have marched in unprecedented numbers to express pride in who they are — including in places where they still face the risk of violent attack.

Hong Kong — If you thought that an apology from chief executive Carrie Lam, and her decision to postpone consideration of that controversial extradition law, had quelled the anger in Hong Kong's streets, think again. Lam insists that postponing the law doesn't mean the idea is dead. And the most determined of the protesters have made clear they still want Lam's resignation, permanent withdrawal of the extradition law, and the exoneration of protesters who've already been arrested. To underline their seriousness, hundreds surrounded police headquarters for more than six hours on Thursday. We're watching to see if anyone can dial down the temperature on Hong Kong's streets.

That kid in Istanbul who caught a two-year old girl who fell out a window — See for yourself. Click here.

What We're Ignoring

G20 Critics Who Dis Osaka's Hip Hop Grandmas — Yes, it's hot outside. It's very hot. But Osaka is staging the G20 summit, and visitors must be welcomed. Some wonder if this G20 is just another meeting that could have been an email, but miss the summit and you miss the hip hop dancing grandmas, who are ready to greet one and all.

The world is at a turning point. Help shape our future by taking this one-minute survey from the United Nations. To mark its 75th anniversary, the UN is capturing people's priorities for the future, and crowdsourcing solutions to global challenges. The results will shape the UN's work to recover better from COVID-19, and ensure its plans reflect the views of the global public. Take the survey here.

Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro tested positive for the coronavirus on Tuesday. To understand what that means for the country's politics and public health policy, GZERO sat down with Christopher Garman, top Brazil expert at our parent company, Eurasia Group. The exchange has been lightly edited for clarity and concision.

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The Trump administration sent shockwaves through universities this week when it announced that international students in the US could be forced to return to their home countries if courses are not held in classrooms this fall. Around 1 million foreign students are now in limbo as they wait for institutions to formalize plans for the upcoming semester. But it's not only foreign students themselves who stand to lose out: International students infuse cash into American universities and contributed around $41 billion to the US economy in the 2018-19 academic year. So, where do most of these foreign students come from? We take a look here.

For years, the Philippines has struggled with domestic terrorism. Last Friday, Rodrigo Duterte signed into law a sweeping new anti-terror bill that has the opposition on edge, as the tough-talking president gears up to make broader constitutional changes. Here's a look at what the law does, and what it means for the country less than two years away from the next presidential election.

The legislation grants authorities broad powers to prosecute domestic terrorism, including arrests without a warrant and up to 24 days detention without charges. It also carries harsh penalties for those convicted of terror-related offenses, with a maximum sentence of life in prison without parole. Simply threatening to commit an act of terror on social media can now be punished with 12 years behind bars.

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16,000: Amid a deepening economic crisis in Lebanon that has wiped out people's savings and cratered the value of the currency, more than 16,000 people have joined a new Facebook group that enables people to secure staple goods and food through barter.

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