What We're Watching: ISIS Attacks in Syria

Syria ISIS attack — A suicide bombing in Syria claimed by ISIS killed 14 people including four Americans this week. Two questions we'll be watching: Will this attack impact the pace of President Trump's ordered withdrawal of US troops from Syria, and is the bombing part of a broader ISIS strategy to launch a wave of new attacks as US troops depart?


DNA tests The airline Aeromexico wants more Americans to visit Mexico. So it's come up with an interesting promotion. Just click the link.

What We're Ignoring:

An End to World War II — Vladimir Putin and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will meet next week. On their agenda: an end to World War II. Russia and Japan have never signed a formal peace treaty to end the conflict, and many in Japan continue to hope that, as part of a peace deal, Russia will return a group of Pacific islands seized at the end of the war. Russians call them the Kuril Islands, and Japan still refers to them as the Northern Territories. We're ignoring this story, because we doubt Putin will ever willingly give away a single acre of Russian land.

North Korean beaches — Fans of Puppet Regime know all about those North Korean beaches that will "leave you speechless." Satellite photos suggest a giant beach resort in the Wonsan-Kalma Coastal Tourist Area, a strip of land once used for artillery drills and missile launches, is almost ready for summer fun. We'd love to sneak a peek at the new water slides, but we'll ignore this development until Kim Jong-un feels its fully ready for inspection.

Earlier this year, two powerful cyclones struck the northern coast of Mozambique and were followed by months of torrential rain. Mozambique faced an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. "The coast road from Pemba airport to the city center and its harbor was totally destroyed," said Franco Picciani, operations manager at Eni Rovuma Basin. The damage brought the city's economy to a standstill.

Eni answered the call, providing its equipment and expertise. "We rebuilt the coast road in less than two months," Picciani said. "We work in the area. We have a logistics base here. It's home to us. When the area needed help, we didn't stop to think about it for a minute. It goes without saying that we should look after the community we work in."

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

Are we going to learn anything new from public impeachment hearings?

No, but like with Mueller, you know, people weren't reading the transcript, but they did actually listen to Mueller when he gave his speech. Now, the question is: Are they going to take anything different away from the public impeachment hearings? And the answer is, yes. They'll take very different things away, if they're watching on Fox or if they're watching on MSNBC. Still deeply divided and still can't imagine senators on the GOP impeaching, slash, convicting President Trump.

More Show less

Six months after pro-democracy Hong Kong protesters began marching against an extradition law that would have allowed suspects to be tried in mainland courts, things in the semi-autonomous territory feel on the brink. The question is, the brink of what?

Rather than a sudden break that resolves the crisis one way or another – either a government capitulation or crackdown by Beijing – Hong Kong may instead be facing a prolonged, violent, and costly stalemate. Here's why:

More Show less

Why do journalists keep sources anonymous?

So, anonymity can be granted for a number of reasons. The main one is a risk of retaliation against the person, against their job, against their personal safety. For instance, if you report in a war zone or on a crime victim. It can also be to protect vulnerable people such as children, or if it's just the only way to get the information out.

More Show less