Worried Sick


The "Spanish flu" virus of 1918 killed an estimated 50 million people, more than all the deaths in World War I combined. While global public health efforts have greatly improved mortality rates in more modern outbreaks, experts say the next pandemic is a matter of "when," not "if." In this episode, Ian Bremmer takes a look how diseases spread and become global. His guest, Dr. Anthony Fauci, is a leading epidemiologist and director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the NIH.


Dr. Fauci breaks down some of the biggest health threats facing the world today: HIV/AIDS, Ebola, malaria, tuberculosis, influenza, and the recent rise in cases of measles brought on by the misguided anti-vaccine movement.

Also on the show: Five years after his Ebola diagnosis made international news, NYC's Dr. Craig Spencer tells GZERO Media what he learned from the experience and what his life is like today.

Eni's luminescent solar concentrators can help smart windows and next-generation buildings generate electricity. But even Eni hadn't imagined using this technology to create eyeglasses capable of charging mobile phones and headsets.

Introducing Funny Applications, Eni's video series that imagines new, unexpected uses for technology. Watch the premiere episode.

We've written recently about how the COVID-19 pandemic will hit poorer countries particularly hard. But the burden of the virus' spread also falls more heavily on working class people even in wealthy countries, particularly in Europe and the United States. This is exacerbating the divide between rich and poor that had already upended the political establishment in countries around the world even before anyone had heard of a "novel coronavirus."

Why?

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Meet Mark Wetton, a Kentucky-based businessman who owns a dust-collection factory in Wuhan. He has been there since the beginning of the outbreak, and describes the onset of the COVID-19 outbreak there, life in lockdown, and what things are like today as the city finally begins to reopen its borders and come back to life. He also shares some lessons learned that he hopes Americans will heed.

The coronavirus is likely to hit poorer countries particularly hard, but it is also laying a bigger burden on working class people even in wealthy ones. As less affluent people suffer disproportionately not only from the disease, but also from the economic costs of containing it, we can expect a worsening of income inequalities that have already upended global politics over the past few years. Here is a look at inequality in some of the countries hardest hit by COVID-19 so far.

500 million: The economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic could plunge 500 million people into poverty, according to a new report released by Oxfam. As incomes and economies continue to contract, global poverty will increase for the first time in 30 years, the report predicts, undermining many of the gains of globalization that have pulled millions out of poverty in recent years.

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