A post-pandemic cashless society? Was remote NFL draft a tech success?

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, provides his perspective on technology in the age of the coronavirus pandemic:

Is the coronavirus pandemic leading to a cashless society?

A little bit, yeah. People are using touchless payment systems much more than they're using cash, both because we're not interacting with people directly as much anymore and also because cash is kind of skeezy. There is a little problem with this, though, which is that young people are really happy with Venmo, PayPal, all those other options. Old people get confused by it. It's kind of not fair. This transition is easiest for the people who are least at risk of coronavirus. But there we are.


Was the NFL draft a technological success?

I think so. So, the NFL setup all these different camera crews in Roger Goodell's house. They got special iPhone systems for all the general managers. They set up video streams of all the players who are likely to get drafted. And it went off without too much of a hitch, besides something that went wrong with the Broncos, they thought they wouldn't be able to pick. Mostly, I just follow the draft because I like watching how Bill Belichick trades.

The goal of Eni's High Performance Computing is to perfect and industrialize low carbon energy technologies developed in collaboration with research centers. Eni's efforts are helping to generate energy from waves and guarantee access to energy in remote areas thanks to light-weight and flexible organic photovoltaic panels


Watch Eni's new docuseries on HPC5

Facing the biggest economic crisis in the EU's history, the European Commission's president, Ursula von der Leyen, pulled out all the stops this week, unveiling an unprecedented plan to boost the union's post-coronavirus recovery.

The plan: The EU would go to international capital markets to raise 750 billion euros ($830 billion). 500 billion of that would be given to member states as grants to fund economic recovery over the next seven years; the remainder would be issued as loans to be paid back to Brussels. The EU would pay back its bondholders for the full 750 billion plus interest by 2058, in part by raising new EU-wide taxes on tech companies and emissions.

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"A lot of people are going to die until we solve the political situation," one Brazilian medical expert said recently when asked about the deteriorating public health situation in that country. For months, Brazil has been one of the countries hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic, steered by a President who has repeatedly dismissed the severity of the virus and rejected calls to implement a national social distancing policy. To date, two Brazilian health ministers have either resigned or been fired for pushing back against President Jair Bolsonaro's denialism. Meanwhile, Brazil has emerged as a global epicenter of COVID-19, with almost 27,000 deaths, though health experts believe the real toll is way higher. Here's a look at Brazil's surging daily death toll since it first recorded more than 10 deaths in one day back in late March.

Watch GZERO World as host Ian Bremmer talks to acclaimed foreign policy expert Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations and author of "The World: A Brief Introduction." Haass explains that while the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted every aspect of life as we know it, the major issues confronting geopolitics in the 21st Century already existed.

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62: Southeast Asia is one of the world's largest sources of plastic waste, and Thailand is a big culprit. Before the pandemic, Thailand tried to address the problem by banning single use plastics, but that's fallen apart fast: in April, Thailand recorded a 62 percent increase in plastic use, due largely to increased food deliveries as coronavirus-related lockdowns keep people at home.
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