FROM OUR PARTNERS AT THE STRAITS TIMES

FROM OUR PARTNERS AT THE STRAITS TIMES

Your Signal team recommends this article on Singapore's plans to begin testing German-made air taxis later this year. They look like helicopters, but they're based on drone technology. Two people can reportedly fly about 18 miles in one of these contraptions, and though early flights will include a human pilot, they're expected to eventually operate without one.

Please note: Your Friday author enjoys reading about these things, but there's no way in hell I'll ever climb inside one.

For the article, click here.

Carbon has a bad rep, but did you know it's a building block of life? As atoms evolved, carbon trapped in CO2 was freed, giving way to the creation of complex molecules that use photosynthesis to convert carbon to food. Soon after, plants, herbivores, and carnivores began populating the earth and the cycle of life began.

Learn more about how carbon created life on Earth in the second episode of Eni's Story of CO2 series.

As we enter the homestretch of the US presidential election — which is set to be the most contentious, and possibly contested, in generations — Americans are also voting on 35 seats up for grabs in a battle for the control of the Senate. The 100-member body is currently held 53-47 by the Republican Party, but many individual races are wide open, and the Democrats are confident they can flip the upper chamber of Congress.

Either way, the result will have a profound impact not only on domestic policy, but also on US foreign relations and other issues with global reach. Here are a few areas where what US senators decide reverberates well beyond American shores.

More Show less

The world's two biggest economic powers threaten to create a "big rupture" in geopolitics, but "we are not there yet," UN Secretary-General António Guterres tells Ian Bremmer. In an interview for GZERO World, the leader of the world's best-known multilateral organization discusses the risks involved as the US and China grow further apart on key issues.

Watch the episode: UN Secretary-General António Guterres: Why we still need the United Nations

Movses Abelian, Under-Secretary-General for General Assembly and Conference Management, acknowledges that this year's gathering of world leaders presents unique challenges. But, he says, the work of the UN continues. For two decades he has had a pivotal role in organizing thousands of key diplomatic meetings during these important weeks in NYC. In this video, Abelian explains the General Assembly, how it has worked in the past, and what to expect this year.

"I'd like to say that the recovery is underway but that it is uncertain, incomplete and uneven." European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde tells Ian Bremmer how 27 EU member states were able to set aside decades-long political grievances in order to act quickly on economic relief for the millions of Europeans hit hard by the pandemic.

The exchange is part of a wide-ranging interview for GZERO World. The episode begins airing nationally in the US on public television Friday, September 25. Check local listings.

UNGA banner

GZEROMEDIA

Subscribe to GZERO Media's Newsletter: Signal

Episode 4: The World Goes Gray

Living Beyond Borders Podcasts