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125: China has authorized $125 billion of new rail projects since early December. Plans for 6,800 kilometers of new railways, including 3,200 kilometers of new high-speed rail, are part of a broader effort to stem the effects of an economic slowdown that's hitting as Beijing attempts to manage it standoff with the US over trade.

55: Plagued by under-staffed security forces, the government in Kabul controls just 55 percent of Afghanistan's territory, according to US government figures – an area containing just under two-thirds of the population. That leaves over 12 million people living under control of the Taliban and other groups and complicates any US attempt to withdraw from the country after 18 years of conflict.

48: If current trends hold, the world will boast 48 cities with populations over 10 million people by 2035, up from 33 today. Of the 15 contenders for mega-city status, 10 are in Asia, 2 are in the Middle East, 2 are in Africa, and 1 is in Europe. None are in the Americas.

3.4: US carbon dioxide emissions rose 3.4 percent in 2018 – the biggest increase in 8 years, according to an initial estimate – despite sharp reduction in the number of active US coal-fired power plants. A booming economy, including a strong performance by the energy hungry manufacturing sector, looks to be the main driver.

Empathy and listening are key to establishing harmonious relationships, as demonstrated by Callista Azogu, GM of Human Resources & Organization for Nigerian Agip Oil Company (NAOC), an Eni subsidiary in Abuja. "To build trust is very difficult. To destroy it is very easy," says Callista, whose busy days involve everything from personnel issues to union relationships. She sees great potential for her native Nigeria not only because of the country's natural resources, but because of its vibrant and creative people.

Learn more about Callista in this episode of Faces of Eni.

For the world's wealthiest nations, including the United States, the rollout of COVID-19 vaccine has been rocky, to say the least. And as a result, much of the developing world will have to wait even longer for their turn. Part of the challenge, World Bank President David Malpass says, is that "advanced economies have reserved a lot of the vaccine doses." Malpass sat down with Ian Bremmer recently to talk about what his organization is doing to try to keep millions around the world from slipping deeper into poverty during the pandemic. Their conversation was part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Saturday will mark the beginning of an historic turning point for European politics as 1,001 voting members of Germany's Christian Democratic Union, the party of Chancellor Angela Merkel, hold an online conference to elect a new leader.

Here are the basic facts:

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For the first time in twenty years, extreme poverty around the world is growing. How does the developing world recover from a pandemic that has brought even the richest nations to their knees? David Malpass, the President of the World Bank, is tasked with answering that question. He joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to talk about how his organization is trying to keep the developing world from slipping further into poverty in the wake of a once-in-a-century pandemic.

Joe Biden wants to move into the White House, but the coast isn't clear. He may need some bleach.

Watch more PUPPET REGIME here.

The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

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