Hard Numbers

11 billion: The shutdown that closed parts of the US federal government cost the US $11 billion in December and January, according to an initial estimate by the Congressional Budget Office. While some economic activity will rebound as government workers get back pay, the CBO estimated that around $3 billion of the loss may be unrecoverable.

500 million: Two years after the launch of a Saudi-led trade and travel embargo, Qatar is stepping backonto the global stage. The Gulf state recently extended $500 million of financial support to Lebanon. It's also recently hosted the leaders of Pakistan and Sudan, as well as US-Taliban peace talks.

64: There are many signs to suggest globalization is slowing: global goods trade, the profit share of multinational corporations, and foreign direct investment have all fallen over the past decade. But during the same period, the volume of data crossing international borders has increased 64-fold, according to McKinsey.

6: In the past year, the US fell 6 spots on Transparency International's Corruptions Perception Index, a survey of how publics view their governments. The US now ranks 22nd below France, the UK, and Japan.

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Greece's economic crisis brought it to its knees. Now that it's back from the brink, what comes next? Kyriakos Mitsotakis, the man likely to be Greece's next prime minister, weighs in.

When you're in outer space, how do you stay motivated, when it's so lonely and pretty stressful too?

It's actually all about the mission. It sounds a little stereotypical to say that but the work is so important and there just isn't a do over. I mean, if you mess something up and you have to do it over, often you can do that. But there's just - you could be doing other really useful things. In the case of something like capturing a 16-ton supply ship with the robotic arm, there really isn't a do over and I find it's the mission but it's also kind of just saying, you know, "I have done everything I can to be ready." If you've done your best. No one can ask anything more than that. So you're ready.

Do you apply that to your work life now here on the ground?

I do that, you know, but often I'm like, I will say an example of TED here, I was a little worried about giving a talk and forgetting, or not saying everything I meant to say, and that was all wrapped up in me and then I went to the first night of talks here and I realized that everyone's here because they have something to say and people are here to listen. And that was the important mission, as opposed to me worrying about how I felt about it, and that got me through.



And go deeper on topics like cybersecurity and artificial intelligence at Microsoft on The Issues.

Claire Wardle, Executive Director of First Draft joins Isabelle Roughol, Senior Editor-at-Large at LinkedIn for Media in 60 Seconds!

Why should we stop using the term "fake news"?

I refuse to use it to such an extent that I actually say "f*** news." And the reason is because it's just a completely useless term for describing the complexity of the situation. None of this really masquerades as news. It's content, social posts, videos and most of it isn't fake. Most of it is misleading or old content used out of context. So it's not helpful. And more importantly, it's used to attack a free and independent press - globally. Politicians, not just Trump, many politicians on the left and the right use it to attack a free, independent press. Any reporting that they don't like they dismiss. And actually, when journalists keep using it like, "Oh yeah, but that's what the audience uses." Well, they're using a weapon that's used to attack them. There are many words that we no longer use because we know that they're harmful. This is a harmful word and so we should just stop using it. We can say lies, rumors, conspiracies, propaganda. What is it that we're talking about? Because we don't need to use this phrase!