Hard numbers: Are immigrants going to get big in Japan?

140: Pakistan removed the last restrictions on international flights across its territory on Tuesday, ending a 140-day blackout imposed after an altercation with nuclear-armed arch-rival India that led to air strikes in Pakistan and the downing of an Indian fighter jet. The nearly five-month ban forced airlines serving India and other destinations across Asia to cancel flights and make lengthy detours around closed airspace.

1,187: The opioid epidemic isn't just a US problem. Nearly 1,200 people died from drugs in Scotland in 2018 — around 86 percent of cases involved opioids like heroin. Per capita, that's nearly 3 times the drug death rate for the whole UK and more than any other EU country.

2.7 million: There are 2,667,000 foreigners living in Japan now, or just over 2 percent of the total population. That represents an increase of 170,000 over the past year. The country's aging economy needs more young workers, but immigration is a contentious topic in Japan, one of the world's most ethnically homogenous countries.

17: There are only 17 countries left in the world that maintain full diplomatic relations with Taiwan rather than with Beijing. (You have to choose because Beijing, which sees Taiwan as part of China, will not grant full relations to countries that have formal ties with the island). Of those, over half are in Central America or the Caribbean. Taiwan's president, Tsai Ing-wen, landed in Haiti over the weekend to begin a tour of the region.

"I think there are certain times where you have tectonic shifts and change always happens that way."

On the latest episode of 'That Made All the Difference,' Vincent Stanley, Director of Philosophy at Patagonia, shares his thoughts on the role we all have to play in bringing our communities and the environment back to health.

For many, Paul Rusesabagina became a household name after the release of the 2004 tear-jerker film Hotel Rwanda, which was set during the 1994 Rwandan genocide.

Rusesabagina, who used his influence as a hotel manager to save the lives of more than 1,000 Rwandans, has again made headlines in recent weeks after he was reportedly duped into boarding a flight to Kigali, Rwanda's capital, where he was promptly arrested on terrorism, arson, kidnapping and murder charges. Rusesabagina's supporters say he is innocent and that the move is retaliation against the former "hero" for his public criticism of President Paul Kagame, who has ruled the country with a strong hand since ending the civil war in the mid 1990s.

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One of the biggest threats to 21st century international peace is invisible. It recognizes no borders and knows no rules. It can penetrate everything from the secrets of your government to the settings of your appliances. This is, of course, the threat of cyberattacks and cyberwarfare.

During the coronavirus pandemic, cyberattacks have surged, according to watchdogs. This isn't just Zoom-bombing or scams. It's also a wave of schemes, likely by national intelligence agencies, meant to steal information about the development and production of vaccines. Attacks on the World Health Organization soared five-fold early in the pandemic.

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Malaysian political drama: Malaysia's (eternal) opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim says he finally has enough votes in parliament to be appointed prime minister, seven months after the coalition that was going to support him collapsed amid an internal revolt that also forced out 95-year-old Mahathir Mohamed as head of the government. Two years ago, Mahathir — who governed Malaysia from 1980 to 2003 — shocked the country by running in the 2018 election and defeating his former party UMNO, which had dominated Malaysian politics since independence in 1956. After winning, Mahathir agreed to hand over power to Anwar — a former protégé with whom he had a falling out in the late 1990s — but Mahathir's government didn't last long enough to do the swap. Will Anwar now realize his lifelong dream of becoming Malaysia's prime minister? Stay tuned for the next parliamentary session in November.

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Carl Bildt, former Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Sweden, shares his perspective on Europe In 60 Seconds:


Why can't Europe agree on Belarus sanctions?


I think they can agree but the problem is that Cyprus has blocked. There's a veto right inside the European Union and they have blocked everything. I mean, everyone agrees, all of other Member States agrees that we should have had those sanctions in place. But the Cypriots have their own views. And then they are blackmailing, they are saying you have to sanction Turkey as well, at the same time. And most other states say there's no connection between the two. So, we do have somewhat of a constitutional crisis over foreign affairs inside the European Union. Distinctly not a good situation.

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