HARD NUMBERS: US Firms are Leaving China but not Going Home

4: Five years after Malaysia Airlines MH17 was shot down over eastern Ukraine as it was flying from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, Dutch-led authorities have charged four people (three Russians and a Ukrainian) in the incident, which killed 298 people. It's highly doubtful any of the suspects will stand trial though, as Russia maintains it had nothing to do with the plane's downing. Fun fact: Russia's constitution prohibits the extradition of its citizens to another state.

6: The American Chamber of Commerce in China conducted a poll last month that found 40% of the group's member companies had moved operations out of China or had plans to do so. But less than 6% of those were relocating operations to the US — the most popular destinations were Southeast Asia (24.7%) and Mexico (10.5%).

10,000: The International Spy Museum in DC estimates that there are "more than 10,000 spies" operating in DC, an assessment backed up by the FBI. And in case anyone was wondering, these are the world's top-notch spies. #SendingUsTheirBest

70.8 million: The UN High Commissioner for Refugees pegged the number of internationally displaced people at the end of 2018 at 70.8 million, the highest number ever recorded. That's 2 million more than there were at the end of 2017 and represents a 65% increase over the last 10 years.

The world is at a turning point. Help shape our future by taking this one-minute survey from the United Nations. To mark its 75th anniversary, the UN is capturing people's priorities for the future, and crowdsourcing solutions to global challenges. The results will shape the UN's work to recover better from COVID-19, and ensure its plans reflect the views of the global public. Take the survey here.

Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro tested positive for the coronavirus on Tuesday. To understand what that means for the country's politics and public health policy, GZERO sat down with Christopher Garman, top Brazil expert at our parent company, Eurasia Group. The exchange has been lightly edited for clarity and concision.

More Show less

For years, the Philippines has struggled with domestic terrorism. Last Friday, Rodrigo Duterte signed into law a sweeping new anti-terror bill that has the opposition on edge, as the tough-talking president gears up to make broader constitutional changes. Here's a look at what the law does, and what it means for the country less than two years away from the next presidential election.

The legislation grants authorities broad powers to prosecute domestic terrorism, including arrests without a warrant and up to 24 days detention without charges. It also carries harsh penalties for those convicted of terror-related offenses, with a maximum sentence of life in prison without parole. Simply threatening to commit an act of terror on social media can now be punished with 12 years behind bars.

More Show less

16,000: Amid a deepening economic crisis in Lebanon that has wiped out people's savings and cratered the value of the currency, more than 16,000 people have joined a new Facebook group that enables people to secure staple goods and food through barter.

More Show less

Ian Bremmer shares his perspective on global politics on this week's World In (More Than) 60 Seconds:

Jair Bolsonaro, the president of Brazil, has coronavirus. What are your thoughts and where does this leave Brazil?

Well, I mean, you know, if coronavirus was karmic, and I don't believe that, Bolsonaro would be the president you kind of expect would get it, right? Because he's been saying, "it's just a little flu, don't worry about it, I don't need to wear a mask, everyone can come out and rally, we can hug, we can hold hands, we can shake hands with no problem." He's been doing that for months now and he's exposed to an awful lot of people, both in Brazil and internationally, including in the United States when he traveled to meet with President Trump in Mar a Lago. And now he's taken the test. The 65-year-old president has coronavirus.

More Show less