How to give an effective performance review

In a performance review, what's the right order of praise and criticism to give?

Well a lot of people love the feedback sandwich. You know where you stick the meat of criticism in between two slices of praise. But I have to say that's a bad idea because the feedback sandwich does not taste as good as it looks. My biggest problem with the feedback sandwich is that in our memories primacy effects and recency effect tend to dominate. We remember the things that happened at the beginning and at the end and whatever's in the middle often fades, which means people might forget the criticism altogether.


You actually just want to give one slice of praise along with your criticism not two. So what goes first? Should it be the good news or the bad news. I think the answer actually depends on the recipient's frame of mind. If the recipient is extremely open then you can actually come right in with the bad news. That also helps if they're nervous because as Dan Pink writes in 'When', we prefer sequences that rise rather than those that fall. And so you can end on a high note. If you tell them, "hey, here's the area that I'd love for you to work on and here's the one thing you did best."

But, if you have a defensive recipient somebody, who might be close minded or narcissistic then you actually want to go the opposite route. Psychologists call it self affirmation where you praise in one domain and then you criticize in a completely unrelated domain. And that way it doesn't sting as much, because you're not threatening their whole ego, you're telling them, "hey, you know what? You were really creative this quarter, your decision making was just terrible."

Coffee is one of the most popular drinks in the world, but that means it creates a lot of waste in the form of cups and used coffee grinds. Every year, we drink out of 600 billion single-use plastic and paper cups, most of which end up in a landfill or our environment. Could coffee also contribute to a more sustainable future? A German company is now recovering leftover coffee grounds from bars, restaurants and hotels, and it's recycling them into reusable coffee cups. In other words, they're creating cups of coffee made from coffee.

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What technology was used to assist Eliud Kipchoge's historic sub two-hour marathon time?

A lot. If you watched the video of him, you saw that he was within a pace group, a whole bunch of runners in front of him cutting the wind. Some runners behind him, actually improving his wind resistance by having people behind him. There was a green laser showing him exactly what time he had to run. He had really high-tech gels that he took, these Maurten gels. I actually like those a lot, too. But the main thing were the shoes. These are the early prototypes of the shoes or the first version. He's now in the third version. But what's most important is there is a carbon fiber plate. You cannot bend this thing. So, Nike introduced these shoes, I don't know, two years ago. Now, there's a new generation. It's very controversial.

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Will the Catalonia question be a big issue in the Spanish election coming up in November?

You bet it will. Passions have been further inflamed now, and the question that has been difficult from the very beginning, by the very heavy prison sentences that was given to those that are accused of sedition, that is organizing the independence referendum. So, passions are heating up. It will be a difficult issue for the entire Spanish political system to handle for years to come.

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You'd think, being the relatively hopeful person that you are, that the nauseating anguish of Brexit would be more or less over now that UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has finally reached a deal with Brussels on how to extricate the UK from the European Union.

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