Hard Numbers

90,000: Special “conquest” prayers were held in all of Turkey’s 90,000 mosques over the weekend to lend support to the government’s recently launched military offensive into Syria. Once a bastion of state-enforced secularism, Turkey under Erdogan has embraced a new Islamic nationalism.


390: 390 women are planning to run for the House of Representatives, more than at any other point in US history. Hillary’s loss, Trump’s win, and the spread of #MeToo have galvanized what could be a sea change in female political participation.

97: According to a recent poll, 97 percent of Brazilians believe their government caters to a small, powerful elite. Look for an outsider to gain traction ahead of the country’s high-stakes October presidential election.

70: Almost 70 percent of female Chinese university students say they have experienced sexual harassment, with fewer than 4 percent reporting them to the police. #MeToo goes global. #WoYeShi

40: In countries with recently ended civil wars, there’s a 40 percent chance of lapsing back into conflict. The risk falls by 1 percent for each subsequent year of peace.

Earlier this year, two powerful cyclones struck the northern coast of Mozambique and were followed by months of torrential rain. Mozambique faced an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. "The coast road from Pemba airport to the city center and its harbor was totally destroyed," said Franco Picciani, operations manager at Eni Rovuma Basin. The damage brought the city's economy to a standstill.

Eni answered the call, providing its equipment and expertise. "We rebuilt the coast road in less than two months," Picciani said. "We work in the area. We have a logistics base here. It's home to us. When the area needed help, we didn't stop to think about it for a minute. It goes without saying that we should look after the community we work in."

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

Are we going to learn anything new from public impeachment hearings?

No, but like with Mueller, you know, people weren't reading the transcript, but they did actually listen to Mueller when he gave his speech. Now, the question is: Are they going to take anything different away from the public impeachment hearings? And the answer is, yes. They'll take very different things away, if they're watching on Fox or if they're watching on MSNBC. Still deeply divided and still can't imagine senators on the GOP impeaching, slash, convicting President Trump.

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Six months after pro-democracy Hong Kong protesters began marching against an extradition law that would have allowed suspects to be tried in mainland courts, things in the semi-autonomous territory feel on the brink. The question is, the brink of what?

Rather than a sudden break that resolves the crisis one way or another – either a government capitulation or crackdown by Beijing – Hong Kong may instead be facing a prolonged, violent, and costly stalemate. Here's why:

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Why do journalists keep sources anonymous?

So, anonymity can be granted for a number of reasons. The main one is a risk of retaliation against the person, against their job, against their personal safety. For instance, if you report in a war zone or on a crime victim. It can also be to protect vulnerable people such as children, or if it's just the only way to get the information out.

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