GZERO Media logo

National Security Strategy: Will The @RealDonaldTrump Please Stand Up?

National Security Strategy: Will The @RealDonaldTrump Please Stand Up?

President Trump’s National Security Strategy, released Monday, describes a world of great power conflict rather than cooperation, in which Russia and China are the United States’ “strategic competitors.” It stresses economic nationalism and strong borders, casts traditional alliances in a more transactional light, and reaffirms the US commitment to spreading democratic values.


No question the world is becoming more adversarial — have you been on Twitter lately you libtard/trumpkin/socialist/fascist/troll? — but the NSS raises a few key questions.

First — does Trump really believe this stuff? The strong China language squares with Trump’s scorching anti-Beijing campaign rhetoric, though he has taken a much softer tone with China since meeting Xi last April. But Trump’s open admiration for Putin undercuts the assertive tone about Russia, and his embrace of authoritarian leaders like Sisi, Erdogan, Mohamed bin Salman, and Duterte belies the democratic values spiel. Why does this matter? The NSS is meant to clarify the administration’s thinking on key issues. But if the #NSS differs markedly from @RealDonaldTrump, its utility fades fast, for friends and foes.

Second, “competing” with China really means two things: making the bilateral relationship fairer, and outmaneuvering China for influence over other countries. On the bilateral front, there’s a case for hitting China harder over unfair trade, industrial, and intellectual property practices, though risking a full-on trade war could actually hurt American consumers and companies.

But if Trump means to push back against growing Chinese influence elsewhere in the world, it’s hard to see how an America that is shunning multilateralism and spending less money abroad can compete with a newly assertive China that is creating its own new multilateral structures and throwing tons of cash around the world these days.

“America is in the game” Trump said on Monday, “and America is going to win.”

Well, game on.

Empathy and listening are key to establishing harmonious relationships, as demonstrated by Callista Azogu, GM of Human Resources & Organization for Nigerian Agip Oil Company (NAOC), an Eni subsidiary in Abuja. "To build trust is very difficult. To destroy it is very easy," says Callista, whose busy days involve everything from personnel issues to union relationships. She sees great potential for her native Nigeria not only because of the country's natural resources, but because of its vibrant and creative people.

Learn more about Callista in this episode of Faces of Eni.

Saturday will mark the beginning of an historic turning point for European politics as 1,001 voting members of Germany's Christian Democratic Union, the party of Chancellor Angela Merkel, hold an online conference to elect a new leader.

Here are the basic facts:

More Show less

If former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson could give incoming Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas advice, what would it be? "Well, first I would say, 'Ali, I'm glad it's you, not me.'" His conversation with Ian Bremmer was part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Listen: For the first time in twenty years extreme poverty around the world is growing. How does the developing world recover from a pandemic that has brought even the richest nations to their knees? David Malpass, the President of the World Bank, is tasked with answering that question. He joins Ian Bremmer on the podcast to talk about how his organization is trying to keep the developing world from slipping further into poverty in the wake of a once-in-a-century pandemic.

Does Cuba belong back on the US's State Sponsors of Terrorism list? The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board showed their support for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's decision on this issue in a recent opinion piece, "Cuba's Support for Terror." But in this edition of The Red Pen, Ian Bremmer and Eurasia Group analysts Risa Grais-Targow, Jeffrey Wright and Regina Argenzio argue that the WSJ's op-ed goes too far.

We are now just a few days away from the official end of Donald Trump's presidency, but the impacts of his latest moves in office will obviously last far beyond Joe Biden's inauguration. There's the deep structural political polarization, the ongoing investigations into the violence we saw at the Capitol, lord knows what happens over the next few days, there's also last-minute policy decisions here and abroad. And that's where we're taking our Red Pen this week, specifically US relations with Cuba.

More Show less
The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

GZEROMEDIA

Subscribe to GZERO Media's Newsletter: Signal