Scroll to the top

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Joe Biden looks on before speaking during a roundtable discussion on public safety at the State Dining Room at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 28, 2024.

REUTERS/Tom Brenner

President Biden issued an executive order targeting entities that affect every web user, whether they realize it or not. The order aims to restrict data brokers from selling Americans’ personal data to “countries of concern” like China, Russia, Iran, North Korea and Cuba.

Read moreShow less

FILE PHOTO: U.S. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jim Jordan (R-OH) sits before a hearing of the House Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. June 21, 2023.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

The “most corroborating evidence” for impeaching President Joe Biden came from a highly credible, human source, Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) said in January. This week, a memo filed by the US Department of Justice claims that the source has “extensive foreign ties” with an all too familiar election meddler.

Read moreShow less

The Pornhub logo is seen on an iPhone mobile device in this illustration photo in Warsaw, Poland on 12 October, 2022.

REUTERS

If the British communications regulator has its way, visiting porn sites in the UK is about to become a much more intimate process.

Responding to parliamentarians’ criticisms that those “click yes if you’re an adult” boxes do too little to shield kids from smut, a new proposal would require triple-X sites to demand users’ banking details, photo ID, credit card, or even a biometric face scan to prove they are over 18.

Read moreShow less

Noa Kirel from Israel performs during the grand final of the 2023 Eurovision Song Contest in Liverpool, Britain, May 13, 2023.

REUTERS/Phil Noble

The search is underway for representatives from each of the 37 countries participating in the 2024 Eurovision song contest. The competition’s slogan might be United by Music, but as always, politics are never far from the stage.

This year, the controversy concerns Israel. Calls are growing for the country to be kicked out over its assault on the Gaza Strip, which has drawn accusations of war crimes and genocide. Many are citing as a precedent the 2022 expulsion of Russia over its invasion of Ukraine.

Israel’s entry: 20 year oldEden Golan was selected after performing Aerosmith’s “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing” to a hall of empty chairs, meant as a tribute to the Gaza hostages. Israel has been in Eurovision since the 1970s and has won four times — most recently in 2018.

Could Israel be expelled? Entries can be fined or disqualified for bringing politics onto the stage. But Israel’s expulsion is unlikely at this point. The final say rests with Eurovision officials, and so far they’re singing an evasive tune, saying, “Comparisons between wars and conflicts are complex and difficult and, as a nonpolitical media organization, not ours to make.”

TikTok's CEO Shou Zi Chew testifies during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on online child sexual exploitation, at the U.S. Capitol, in Washington, U.S., January 31, 2024.

REUTERS/Nathan Howard

It's time for TikTokers to enter their miming era. Countless videos suddenly went silent as music from top stars like Drake and Taylor Swift disappeared from the popular app on Thursday. The culprit? Universal Music Group – the world’s largest record company – could not secure a new licensing deal with the powerful information-sharing video platform.

Read moreShow less

Taylor Swift poses on the red carpet for the 2022 MTV Europe Music Awards (EMAs) at the PSD Bank Dome in Duesseldorf, Germany, November 13, 2022.

REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay

Some conservative commentators likeJesse Watters, Laura Loomer, Benny Johnson — and even former presidential candidateVivek Ramaswamy — are peddling theories that Taylor Swift is the mastermind behind Joe Biden’s reelection campaign and is helping rig the results of Super Bowl LVIII.

Read moreShow less

An oblong repousse gold ornament with three bands of decora is displayed in this undated handout picture obtained by Reuters.

The Trustees of the British Museum/Handout via REUTERS

If someone takes your stuff and only returns it with conditions attached, you might be the victim of a mafia swindling. Or British imperialism.

The looted “crown jewels” of Ghana are being returned to the country by two prominent British museums on a three-year loan agreement, with an option to extend for another three years.

Read moreShow less

Admiral Rob Bauer, seen here in Tallinn, Estonia, in September 2022.

REUTERS/Janis Laizans

Almost two years after Russia’s invasion, Ukraine’s existential battle continues. The static frontlines look a lot like a stalemate, and US public and political opinions toward further funding for Ukraine are in doubt, but fears of regional escalation remain. Just this week, for example, the Belarusian defense minister said he would put forward a new military doctrine allowing for the use of nuclear weapons.

In response to possible aggression falling into NATO territory, the alliance is hellbent on preparedness. Addressing fellow NATO leaders in Brussels on Wednesday, Admiral Rob Bauer, chair of the NATO Military Committee, warned of the need to prepare for an era “in which anything can happen at any time. An era in which we need to expect the unexpected.” Bauer and his colleagues are meeting to discuss attempts to do just that with Steadfast Defender, the largest military exercise in Europe since the Cold War.

Showing off friendly muscle. The NATO training exercises, to be held from February to June in Germany, Poland, and the Baltics, will involve more than 40,000 troops from across the 31-nation alliance (plus pending member Sweden). The work will test the troops’ ability to quickly mobilize in case of a Russian attack while showing off the alliance’s strength and unity.

Not to be outdone, Russia will also host military drills this year with “Ocean-2024,” bringing together all branches of the Russian Armed Forces and units of “foreign states,” according to Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu.

Latest

NATO bares its teeth