Coronavirus coverage

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Got through the Fourth of July. Pretty rough one for 2020 here in the United States. Still in the thick of it as we see caseload exploding in the United States. But really, the virus is all about developing markets right now. Poor countries around the world very soon, with the exception of the US and the UK, all of the top 10 countries around the world in terms of coronavirus caseload will be poorer countries. Let's keep in mind, these are countries that test a lot less, which means the actual numbers, in the United States the experts are saying probable likelihood of total cases is about 10x what we've actually seen in the US, in emerging markets and most of them, it's more like between 20 and 100. In other words, this is really where the virus now is.

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Carl Bildt, former Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Sweden, shares his perspective from Europe (specifically, from Croatia at the moment):

What's been the European reaction to the allegations in the US that Russia has been paying Taliban for attacking US forces?

Well, I think the reaction has been fairly limited, and I think one reason for that is that I doubt very much that European governments or relevant agencies have been briefed on this particular piece of intelligence. And until it's sorted out, what is the reality behind it? I don't think you will see very much of a European reaction.

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The United States and the European Union have comparable population sizes, but the trajectories of their COVID-19 outbreaks have been vastly different. Data recently released by the European Center for Disease Control and Prevention shows that while new COVID cases in the EU are 82 percent lower than at the peak in April, the United States recorded over 53,000 new cases of the virus on Wednesday, the largest single day total since the pandemic hit. And while some politicians in the US have ascribed the difference to discrepancies in testing, a close analysis shows that the United States and the EU are conducting roughly the same number of tests per million people. Here's a look at the seven-day rolling average of new COVID cases in the EU and the US since March.


UPDATE: Through July 5, US coronavirus cases have continued to increase. The widening chart:

The Graphic Truth: The US pandemic is totally different (and much worse) than the EU's

As the coronavirus continues to sweep across the United States, hospitals around the country are seeing a crush of COVID-19 patients requiring urgent care. In recent weeks, medical professionals in a number of states have said that they were unprepared not only for the number of infected people that would require treatment, but also for the length of time patients would need to stay in the hospital. Many cities and towns are now facing the possibility of massive hospital bed shortages. Here's a look at hospital bed occupancy rates, state by state.

The coronavirus global death toll topped 500,000 this week. The pandemic has unleashed twin public health and economic crises in most parts of the world, and some countries have been hit particularly hard by both. Here we take a look at COVID-19 fatalities per 100,000 people and Q1 2020 economic performance rates in the 10 countries with most deaths worldwide.

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Happy Monday with coronavirus still going on. So it's in the middle. And we've got plenty to talk about. I'll get right into it. Cases, of course, are going up all over the world. And despite the fact that we are paying the most attention to the United States right now, it's important to recognize that within about a week, most of the countries that that are leading the "league tables" as it were, in case load, are going to be outside of the advanced industrial economies. Indeed, I would say within a week, the U.S. and U.K. will be the only remaining countries of the top 10 that are wealthy democracies. The rest are going to be developing countries. And that is where this disease is going, despite all of the challenges here in the United States.
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The United States and the European Union have comparable population sizes, but the trajectories of their COVID-19 outbreaks have been vastly different. Data recently released by the European Center for Disease Control and Prevention shows that while there are around 4,000 new COVID cases in the EU each day, the United States is now recording over 40,000 new cases of the virus each day. At least 11 US states broke records for the number of new cases reported over the past week. And while some politicians in the US have ascribed the difference to discrepancies in testing, a close analysis shows that the United States and the EU are conducting roughly the same number of tests per million people. Here's a look at the seven-day rolling average of new COVID cases in the EU and the US since March.

Lockdowns and social distancing restrictions have brought much of the global economy to a halt over the past few months. As the virus continued to spread (there are now cases in over 200 countries and territories) the IMF updated its original growth forecast for 2020 – twice – and the predictions are increasingly grim. The world's largest economies – China, the US and the Euro area – are set to experience massive year-on-year contraction. But there's a silver lining: The IMF says that there are signs of an economic recovery for these economic regions in 2021. Here's a look at the numbers.

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