Graphic Truth: China's Battered Economy

News on Monday that China's economy grew more slowly in the second quarter of 2019 than at any time since 1990 sent shudders through markets and renewed concerns that the effects of US-led trade war are starting to bite. Here's a picture of China's growing economic woes.

Last week, in Fulton, WI, together with election officials from the state of Wisconsin and the election technology company VotingWorks, Microsoft piloted ElectionGuard in an actual election for the first time.

As voters in Fulton cast ballots in a primary election for Wisconsin Supreme Court candidates, the official count was tallied using paper ballots as usual. However, ElectionGuard also provided an encrypted digital tally of the vote that enabled voters to confirm their votes have been counted and not altered. The pilot is one step in a deliberate and careful process to get ElectionGuard right before it's used more broadly across the country.

Read more about the process at Microsoft On The Issues.

27,000: The Emir of Qatar has decreed a $27,000 fine and up to five years in prison for anyone who publishes, posts, or repost content that aims to "harm the national interest" or "stir up public opinion." No word on whether the Doha-based Al-Jazeera network, long a ferocious and incisive critic of other Arab governments, will be held to the same standard.

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Coronavirus, and the anxiety it provokes, have spread far beyond China. More than 1,200 additional cases are now confirmed across more than 30 countries. Fears are growing that the outbreak has reached the early stages of a global pandemic, because infections in South Korea, Italy, and Iran have no apparent connection to China, where the first reported cases emerged.

Alongside its obvious public health and economic effects, coronavirus is also shaking up politics—especially in a few countries where governments have good cause to worry how citizens will judge their performance.

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Ian Bremmer explains the history and significance of the annual Munich Security Conference, now in its 56th year. The gathering of heads of state and top foreign and security ministers has diffused some political bombs and been the source of stinging barbs as world leaders spar on a global stage and behind closed doors.

Joseph Stiglitz, American economist, public policy analyst, and professor at Columbia University spoke with Ian Bremmer at the Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany. The Nobel prize-winning economist weighs in on the global impact of coronavirus and whether or not he feels the U.S. economy is in good shape. Spoiler alert: He doesn't believe the hype.