Hard Numbers: Hong Kong Protests Hit The Airport

15: In an early primary vote held over the weekend, Argentine President Mauricio Macri and his austerity policies were walloped by 15 percentage points (47-32) by the opposition ticket helmed by Alberto Fernandez and his running mate, former president Cristina Kirchner. The scale of the defeat that polls had predicted would be much closer bodes ill for Macri's chances in the first round of national voting in October.

60,000: An estimated 60,000 people hit the streets in Moscow over the weekend to protest the government's move to ban opposition politicians from the Russian capital's upcoming elections. Vladimir Putin, who spent the weekend meeting a right-wing biker gang in Crimea, has remained silent about the protests, which have dragged on for a month and are the biggest in Russia in eight years.

9: In sub-Saharan Africa, nearly 9% of youths are enrolled in vocational colleges or universities. That's double the percentage in 2000, but governments continue to face challenges delivering good jobs once graduates hit the labor market. Around 1 in 9 Africans with higher education live abroad in an OECD country; just 1 in 30 Asians with similar qualifications do so.

5: Hong Kong's Cathay Pacific airline saw its shares tumble almost 5% on Monday as Hong Kong protests rolled into their eleventh week and forced the cancellation of all flights as protestors occupied the city's main terminal. Meanwhile, Beijing warned that the protests had begun showing "early signs of terrorism."

Coffee is one of the most popular drinks in the world, but that means it creates a lot of waste in the form of cups and used coffee grinds. Every year, we drink out of 600 billion single-use plastic and paper cups, most of which end up in a landfill or our environment. Could coffee also contribute to a more sustainable future? A German company is now recovering leftover coffee grounds from bars, restaurants and hotels, and it's recycling them into reusable coffee cups. In other words, they're creating cups of coffee made from coffee.

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

What technology was used to assist Eliud Kipchoge's historic sub two-hour marathon time?

A lot. If you watched the video of him, you saw that he was within a pace group, a whole bunch of runners in front of him cutting the wind. Some runners behind him, actually improving his wind resistance by having people behind him. There was a green laser showing him exactly what time he had to run. He had really high-tech gels that he took, these Maurten gels. I actually like those a lot, too. But the main thing were the shoes. These are the early prototypes of the shoes or the first version. He's now in the third version. But what's most important is there is a carbon fiber plate. You cannot bend this thing. So, Nike introduced these shoes, I don't know, two years ago. Now, there's a new generation. It's very controversial.

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Will the Catalonia question be a big issue in the Spanish election coming up in November?

You bet it will. Passions have been further inflamed now, and the question that has been difficult from the very beginning, by the very heavy prison sentences that was given to those that are accused of sedition, that is organizing the independence referendum. So, passions are heating up. It will be a difficult issue for the entire Spanish political system to handle for years to come.

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You'd think, being the relatively hopeful person that you are, that the nauseating anguish of Brexit would be more or less over now that UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has finally reached a deal with Brussels on how to extricate the UK from the European Union.

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