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The economic impact of coronavirus

Differences in strong unified national response, vs not: In Japan, everyone listened to the government. If they say wear a mask, everyone wears a mask. If they say engage in social distancing, everyone engages in social distancing. In South Korea, too - enables effective response.

In the US or Italy, there's much more individualism, irrespective of liking government. In Italy, mayors are pleading and shouting obscenities at citizens because they're not listening. Authority doesn't matter. In France, too. Contrast in Germany, strong support for the German government; in Western countries, one of the best response functions we've seen.


A reason you need consistent shutdown early: avoid overwhelming the health care system. If people can't get needed intensive care, fatality rates around coronavirus go up 5 - 10 times. There are knock on implications of a health care system not functioning: cross infection. People with chronic and severe conditions unrelated to coronavirus unable access critical medical care. That has knock on effects on the economy. You need to surge on available tests and ability to test, before discussing when to open up the economy.

Good news, this is a top priority in the developed world; surging on test capabilities, masks, ventilators is moving fast. US companies like Roche making hundreds of thousands of test kits per week, will get us to a place that medical systems will not. We'll be in a position not to be overwhelmed, probably within a month in many localities. There's danger that systems get overwhelmed before then - possibility in New York and other municipalities in the next 2 - 4 weeks. That's the biggest danger zone for the US. Parts of Europe, e.g., Spain. Possibly Paris.

In emerging markets, bigger problems: bad, late governance. In Mexico, in Brazil, leaders refuse to accept reality, providing fake news to their people. Not like Trump exaggerating when a cure might come or suggesting medicines could help to respond, that lead to a run on those medicines. Even with Trump's press conferences, which have replaced his rallies, you're getting real news from Pence, the surgeon general, the NIH, Tony Fauci. In the US, general information around the crisis is not great, but it's not godawful. In Mexico, in Brazil, in certain emerging markets, people are getting fake news. That it's not really a danger. It's not really a crisis. You can't get it. Don't worry. Act normally. Disaster for countries that can least afford a failed response.

Lack of coordination globally makes it harder to address crisis. If you can shut down borders effectively, doesn't matter as much. The economic hit is much greater. Restarting supply chain in China. In Malaysia, supply chain is shut down for a minimum of two weeks - going to be longer. Malaysia has a lot of components of electronic goods. Supply chain across Asia, rolling hits. True in Latin America. No global response, nor an equal global rollout of this crisis.

It takes time to restart the economy. Laid off workers won't be immediately available. Restaurants needs to hire, integrate. That's the case with many different components of our interconnected economy. Supply chain & labor disruptions, people that are ill, all make it harder to get the economy going.

Second quarter will be the worst quarter we will have experienced in our lifetimes. Third quarter will be bad. That implies that we're in a heavy recession right now. Potential for further outbreaks forcing a 2nd round of economic closures is significant. That would be the worst economic and market outcome for this crisis. Despite the political pressure to get markets open and get the economy open again - if you have to shut down the economy again and reestablish quarantine, confidence will be shot.

People aren't suddenly going to feel comfortable going to restaurants, malls. It's going to take time to get back up to speed. Even with strong stimulus, 2 trillion dollars in the US (could be bigger than that). Congress goes away, a lot of them already have tested positive for coronavirus or are under self-quarantine. Getting them back together to negotiate a new bill is probably a minimum of 4 weeks away. If we get major market crashes in the interim, don't look to Congress for help. That is an issue.

Carbon has a bad rep, but did you know it's a building block of life? As atoms evolved, carbon trapped in CO2 was freed, giving way to the creation of complex molecules that use photosynthesis to convert carbon to food. Soon after, plants, herbivores, and carnivores began populating the earth and the cycle of life began.

Learn more about how carbon created life on Earth in the second episode of Eni's Story of CO2 series.

As we enter the homestretch of the US presidential election — which is set to be the most contentious, and possibly contested, in generations — Americans are also voting on 35 seats up for grabs in a battle for the control of the Senate. The 100-member body is currently held 53-47 by the Republican Party, but many individual races are wide open, and the Democrats are confident they can flip the upper chamber of Congress.

Either way, the result will have a profound impact not only on domestic policy, but also on US foreign relations and other issues with global reach. Here are a few areas where what US senators decide reverberates well beyond American shores.

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On September 23, GZERO Media — in partnership with Microsoft and Eurasia Group — gathered global experts to discuss global recovery from the coronavirus pandemic in a livestream panel. Our panel for the discussion Crisis Response & Recovery: Reimagining while Rebuilding, included:

  • Brad Smith, President, Microsoft
  • Ian Bremmer, President and Founder, Eurasia Group & GZERO Media
  • Jeh Johnson, Partner, Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, LLP and former Secretary of Homeland Security.
  • John Frank, Vice President, UN Affairs at Microsoft
  • Susan Glasser, staff writer and Washington columnist, The New Yorker (moderator)

Special appearances by UN Secretary-General António Guterres, European Central Bank chief Christine Lagarde, and comedian/host Trevor Noah.

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Jon Lieber, who leads Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, offers insights on the Supreme Court vacancy:

Will Senate Republicans, who stopped a Supreme Court nomination in 2016, because it was too close to an election, pay a political price for the change in tactics this time around?

Not only do I think they won't pay a political price, I think in many cases, they're going to benefit. Changing the balance of power on the Supreme Court has been a career-long quest for many conservatives and many Republicans. And that's why you've seen so many of them fall in line behind the President's nomination before we even know who it is.

At this point, do Senate Democrats have any hope of stopping President Trump from filling the ninth seat on the Supreme Court?

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In a special GZERO Media livestream on global response and recovery amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Eurasia Group & GZERO Media president Ian Bremmer discussed the difference between Europe's unified approach to economic stimulus and the deeply divided and political nature of the current conversation in the US. While initial stimulus support was bipartisan, there is little chance of Democrats and Republicans coming together again ahead of the November 3 presidential election. "It's red state versus blue state. President Trump's saying that coronavirus isn't so bad if you take the blue states out. He's president of the blue states, you can't take the blue states out," Bremmer told moderator Susan Glasser of The New Yorker.

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Panel: How will the world recover from COVID-19?

UNGA Livestream