What We're Watching - Protests and more protests

What We're Watching - Protests and more protests

Sudan crackdown - Witnesses say government-aligned Sudanese paramilitaries have thrown dozens of bodies into the Nile to try to hide the number of pro-democracy protesters they've killed in Khartoum this week. More than 100 people have reportedly been killed during the crackdown that followed the protesters' refusal to accept a military-controlled transition to elections and a civilian government. In April, the demonstrators forced an end to the 30-year reign of President Omar al-Bashir.

Fury in Honduras - Security forces have responded with live ammunition to nationwide protests led by doctors and teachers demanding the resignation of President Juan Orlando Hernández. The demonstrators accuse the deeply unpopular Hernández, a key US ally in Central America, of both incompetence and corruption following proposed cuts to public services and fresh revelations that he's been the subject of a US Drug Enforcement Administration trafficking investigation.

Protests in Prague - In one of the largest Czech protests in decades, demonstrators in Prague's Wenceslas Square have called for the resignation of Prime Minister Andrej Babiš, who has been accused of misusing EU subsidies. Czech police say he should face fraud charges, but Babiš — a wealthy businessman elected in 2017 — insists that the size of the protest, estimated by organizers at 120,000 people, revealed more about the nice weather than about his political future.

What We're Ignoring - Inflatable assassination

The Attack on Baby Trump - A British Donald Trump supporter has filmed herself attacking London's famous 20-foot-tall inflatable baby Trump balloon with a knife. You can see her adventure here. It appears the attacker herself was more seriously wounded than Baby Trump. "I'm bleeding quite badly," she's heard saying during the clip, while a journalist at the scene reported that "Trump Baby was only lightly wounded in today's attack and stands at full pressurization."

Microsoft announced earlier this year the launch of a new United Nations representation office to deepen their support for the UN's mission and work. Many of the big challenges facing society can only be addressed effectively through multi-stakeholder action. Whether it's public health, environmental sustainability, cybersecurity, terrorist content online or the UN's Sustainable Development Goals, Microsoft has found that progress requires two elements - international cooperation among governments and inclusive initiatives that bring in civil society and private sector organizations to collaborate on solutions. Microsoft provided an update on their mission, activities for the 75th UN General Assembly, and the team. To read the announcement from Microsoft's Vice President of UN Affairs, John Frank, visit Microsoft On The Issues.

The coronavirus pandemic has radically accelerated the adoption of digital technology in the global economy, creating an opportunity for millions of new businesses and jobs. However, it has also left millions jobless and exposed yet another vulnerability: hundreds of millions of people lack access to this technology.

To be sure, this divide was already present before COVID-19 struck. But unequal access to the internet and technology is going to make the multiple impacts of the pandemic much worse for offline and unskilled communities, among others. In fact, there is not a single global digital gap, but rather several ones that the coronavirus will likely exacerbate.

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As the UN turns 75, the organization is revealing the results of a global survey of nearly a million people in 193 nations—what matters most to them, and how do they view the need for global cooperation at this time of unprecedented crisis? Under-Secretary-General and Special Adviser Fabrizio Hochschild explains the purpose and findings of the report.

The world's largest multilateral organization was born out of the global crisis of World War II. Now, as another crisis rocks the world, the United Nations is facing a challenge of its own—to remain relevant in an increasingly nationalistic geopolitical environment. On the eve of the first virtual UN General Assembly, GZERO World host Ian Bremmer spoke to UN Secretary-General António Guterres about pandemic response, climate action, the US/China schism, and more.

News broke across the United States on Friday evening that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had died, ending her long and distinguished career as a jurist. Tributes poured in quickly from men and women on both sides of the political spectrum. But just as quickly, her death has sharply raised the stakes for the upcoming US elections for president and the Senate, as well as the longer-term ideological balance of the nation's top court.

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