What We're Watching - Protests and more protests

Sudan crackdown - Witnesses say government-aligned Sudanese paramilitaries have thrown dozens of bodies into the Nile to try to hide the number of pro-democracy protesters they've killed in Khartoum this week. More than 100 people have reportedly been killed during the crackdown that followed the protesters' refusal to accept a military-controlled transition to elections and a civilian government. In April, the demonstrators forced an end to the 30-year reign of President Omar al-Bashir.

Fury in Honduras - Security forces have responded with live ammunition to nationwide protests led by doctors and teachers demanding the resignation of President Juan Orlando Hernández. The demonstrators accuse the deeply unpopular Hernández, a key US ally in Central America, of both incompetence and corruption following proposed cuts to public services and fresh revelations that he's been the subject of a US Drug Enforcement Administration trafficking investigation.

Protests in Prague - In one of the largest Czech protests in decades, demonstrators in Prague's Wenceslas Square have called for the resignation of Prime Minister Andrej Babiš, who has been accused of misusing EU subsidies. Czech police say he should face fraud charges, but Babiš — a wealthy businessman elected in 2017 — insists that the size of the protest, estimated by organizers at 120,000 people, revealed more about the nice weather than about his political future.

What We're Ignoring - Inflatable assassination

The Attack on Baby Trump - A British Donald Trump supporter has filmed herself attacking London's famous 20-foot-tall inflatable baby Trump balloon with a knife. You can see her adventure here. It appears the attacker herself was more seriously wounded than Baby Trump. "I'm bleeding quite badly," she's heard saying during the clip, while a journalist at the scene reported that "Trump Baby was only lightly wounded in today's attack and stands at full pressurization."

Imagine losing your child in their first year of life and having no idea what caused it. This is the heartbreaking reality for thousands of families each year who lose a child to Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID). Despite decades-long efforts to prevent SUID, it remains the leading cause of death for children between one month and one year of age in developed nations. Working in collaboration with researchers at Seattle Children's Research Institute and the University of Auckland, Microsoft analyzed the Center for Disease Control (CDC) data on every child born in the U.S. over a decade, including over 41 million births and 37,000 SUID deaths.

By pairing Microsoft's capabilities and data scientists with Seattle Children's medical research expertise, progress is being made on identifying the cause of SUID. Earlier this year, a study was published that estimated approximately 22% of SUID deaths in the U.S. were attributable to maternal cigarette-smoking during pregnancy, giving us further evidence that, through our collaboration with experts in varying disciplines, we are getting to the root of this problem and making remarkable advances.

Read more at Microsoft On The Issues.

After a months-long investigation into whether President Donald Trump pressured Ukraine's president into investigating his political rivals in order to boost his reelection prospects in 2020, House Democrats brought two articles of impeachment against him, charging him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Click here for our GZERO guide to what comes next.

In the meantime, imagine for a moment that you are now Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority leader and senior member of Donald Trump's Republican Party. You've got big choices to make.

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Trump gets his deal – House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced yesterday that Democrats will back the USMCA, the US-Mexico-Canada trade agreement that will replace the North American Free Trade Agreement. Crucially, the bill will also have support from the nation's largest labor union. This is a major political victory for President Trump, who promised he would close this deal, but it's also good for Pelosi: it shows that the Democrats' House majority can still accomplish big things even as it impeaches the president. But with the speed of the Washington news cycle these days, we're watching to see if anyone is still talking about USMCA three days after it's signed.

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After a months-long investigation into whether President Donald Trump pressured Ukraine's president into investigating his political rivals in order to boost his reelection prospects in 2020, House Democrats on Tuesday brought two articles of impeachment against him. They charge Trump with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

So, what are the next steps?

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