Is Australia becoming more hostile to journalists?

Is Australia becoming more hostile to journalists?

Yes. There were two raids this week against ABC and against a journalist's home related to stories published from leaked government documents. Now it's legitimate to investigate a leak. It's usually done on the leak side, not on the journalist's side. It just seemed a massive overreaction in the method. And we've seen similar raids in France this spring in Northern Ireland. I find it concerning that this is coming from liberal democracies and what we're seeing is that as the public discourse against journalists gets more and more hostile the Overton window of what is acceptable behavior from democracies on the press is just shifting further and further away from freedom of the press. I find that concerning.

Should the New York Times allow its reported on opinionated cable shows?

So not according to their leadership. They pulled a reporter from The Rachel Maddow Show this past weekend because they consider it to be too far on the left. Now I appreciate and sympathize with The New York Times desire to maintain their reputation. It just seems in several recent decisions that they think they're in a gentlemen's war with reasonable people - lined up on the field when everyone else is fighting a guerrilla war. So it's honorable but in the end you lose. So I think you know put your reporters on every show that will have them as long as they don't edit your words out of context and then just trust your reporters to share the facts and be truthful.

Coffee is one of the most popular drinks in the world, but that means it creates a lot of waste in the form of cups and used coffee grinds. Every year, we drink out of 600 billion single-use plastic and paper cups, most of which end up in a landfill or our environment. Could coffee also contribute to a more sustainable future? A German company is now recovering leftover coffee grounds from bars, restaurants and hotels, and it's recycling them into reusable coffee cups. In other words, they're creating cups of coffee made from coffee.

Learn more at Eniday: Energy Is A Good Story

What technology was used to assist Eliud Kipchoge's historic sub two-hour marathon time?

A lot. If you watched the video of him, you saw that he was within a pace group, a whole bunch of runners in front of him cutting the wind. Some runners behind him, actually improving his wind resistance by having people behind him. There was a green laser showing him exactly what time he had to run. He had really high-tech gels that he took, these Maurten gels. I actually like those a lot, too. But the main thing were the shoes. These are the early prototypes of the shoes or the first version. He's now in the third version. But what's most important is there is a carbon fiber plate. You cannot bend this thing. So, Nike introduced these shoes, I don't know, two years ago. Now, there's a new generation. It's very controversial.

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Will the Catalonia question be a big issue in the Spanish election coming up in November?

You bet it will. Passions have been further inflamed now, and the question that has been difficult from the very beginning, by the very heavy prison sentences that was given to those that are accused of sedition, that is organizing the independence referendum. So, passions are heating up. It will be a difficult issue for the entire Spanish political system to handle for years to come.

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You'd think, being the relatively hopeful person that you are, that the nauseating anguish of Brexit would be more or less over now that UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has finally reached a deal with Brussels on how to extricate the UK from the European Union.

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