What We're Watching: India's citizenship law challenged

India's supreme court to weigh in on citizenship law – India's southern state of Kerala filed a lawsuit in India's Supreme Court, claiming that a contentious new citizenship law that's caused nationwide protests is discriminatory and violates India's secular constitution. Kerala is the first state to legally challenge the new law backed by Prime Minister Narendra Modi's Hindu nationalist party, which opens a path to Indian citizenship for migrants from neighboring countries— provided that they are not Muslims. In addition to the Kerala action, at least some of the 60 petitions filed by individuals and political parties are also likely to be heard by the court next week. Amid a climate of deepening uncertainty for India's 200 million Muslims, we're watching closely to see how the court rules.


Human rights leaders killed in Colombia – Almost four years ago, the Colombian government signed an historic peace accord with the FARC, the largest of the guerilla-narcotrafficking groups that had waged war on the state for half a century. But since then, the government hasn't been able to re-establish a strong presence in many of the remote, rural areas surrendered by the rebels. As a result, other, smaller armed groups have swept into the vacuum, putting local human rights leaders at extreme risk. According to the United Nations, as many as 120 such activists were murdered in 2019, after 115 were killed the previous year. We are watching to see how the government of President Ivan Duque, who was elected on a platform that was critical of the peace accords, plans to address the problem. Signing the accords was one thing, securing the peace remains quite another.

Impeachment politics – The Senate begins the impeachment trial of President Trump next week, and though the Republican Party's Senate majority assures a verdict in Trump's favor, the proceedings might matter for the November presidential election. First, new evidence that Trump played a direct role in trying to coerce Ukraine's government to help him discredit Joe Biden, the Democratic Party presidential frontrunner, creates trouble for Trump backers who want a quick trial without the testimony of fresh witnesses who could embarrass the president. On the other hand, during the trial, three Democratic presidential contenders—Senators Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, and Amy Klobuchar—must be present for the trial while Biden, Pete Buttigieg and other candidates are free to campaign in early primary states.

What We're Ignoring

Bazooka doubters – A five-year-old cat named Bazooka began an "epic weight loss" journey in the US state of North Carolina this week. Bazooka currently weighs 35 lbs. (That's nearly 16 kilos for you kilo fans.) Catch a glimpse of Bazooka now before his medical care, prescription diet, and workout plan render him unrecognizable—and much healthier. We'll be watching Bazooka closely—but ignoring those who doubt his power to embrace change.

Kevin Sneader, global managing partner of McKinsey & Company, answers the question: Are CEOs getting real about climate change?

The answer, yes. Why? One, it's personal. Many have watched with horror the wildfires that took place recently. Others have even been evacuated. And for some, the snow set in Davos, they experienced incredibly mild temperatures that laid all to quip that climate change really has arrived. But the other reasons are a growing understanding of the nature of climate change.

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Welcome to the eleventh parliamentary elections in Iran's 40-year history.

Want to run for a seat? You can…if you're an Iranian citizen between the ages of 30 and 75, hold a master's degree or its equivalent, have finished your military service (if you're a man), and have demonstrated a commitment to Islam. Check all these boxes, and you can ask permission to run for office.

Permission comes from the 12-member Guardian Council, a body composed of six clerics appointed by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and six jurists that Khamenei appoints indirectly. If the Council says yes, you can win a seat in parliament. If they say no, you can't.

This parliament, also called the Majlis, does have real power. It approves the national budget, drafts legislation and sends it to the Guardian Council for approval, ratifies treaties, approves ministers and can question the president. The current Majlis represents a wide range of values and opinions.

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As the head of a leading management consulting firm, global managing partner of McKinsey & Company Kevin Sneader has an inside view into the challenges facing the world's top executives. Every Thursday, Sneader will address questions about key issues like attracting and retaining talent, growing revenue, navigating change, staying ahead of the competition, and corporate responsibility – all in 60 seconds.

GZERO's Alex Kliment interviews New Yorker correspondent and author Joshua Yaffa. The two discuss Yaffa's new book, Between Two Fires, about what life is like for Russians today. They also sample some vodka at a famous Russian restaurant in NYC, of course!