What We're Watching: Macron unfazed

What We're Watching: Macron unfazed

Macron not backing down over pensions – Despite six days of mass unrest that has paralyzed Paris' public transport system and dented both tourism and Christmas retail, the government will stand firm on a proposal to reform and unify the country's 42 different pension plans. France's pension system, one of the most generous of any major industrialized country, has major budget shortfalls that contribute to the country's ballooning deficit. Last year, Macron abandoned a proposed fuel price hike that ignited the Yellow Vest movement. But overhauling France's "welfare state" was central to his 2017 election platform, and acquiescing to protesters this time around would be political suicide. France's prime minister – tapped to lead the pension reform project – is expected to announce the plan's final details tomorrow. We're watching to see how this might escalate things further.


The future of Muslim migrants in India – India's parliament is currently debating a controversial bill that would open a new path to Indian citizenship for migrants from Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Bangladesh— provided that they are not Muslims. Supporters of the measure say it offers safe haven to persecuted minorities from those countries, but critics say playing religious favorites violates the secular principles of the Indian state. Since first coming to power in 2014, Prime Minister Narendra Modi's Hindu nationalist BJP party and its hardline affiliates have taken steps to boost the primacy of Hinduism in India's public life, creating a climate of deepening uncertainty for the country's 200 million Muslims.

Saudi Arabia ends restaurant gender segregation – In a landmark decision Sunday, Saudi Arabia scrapped a decades-old rule that required restaurants to segregate seating areas and entrances according to sex and marital status. Over the past two years, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) – the country's de facto leader and the first from a new generation– has led a major effort to liberalize Saudi Arabia's extremely conservative society, lifting restrictions on women driving, welcoming in movie theaters for the first time in decades, and permitting women to travel without their male relatives' approval. But these moves have been accompanied by a sustained crackdown on dissent – in many cases, the authorities have targeted precisely the women who fought for some of the freedoms recently granted.

What We're Eating

Grandma's Little Ears – Earlier this year, the Times reports, a restaurant in the southern Italian city of Bari illegally received a large shipment of orecchiette, the "little ear" pasta native to the area, without recording where it came from. This violated strict EU and Italian laws on food origin. Suspicion immediately fell on an unlikely target: le nonne (the grandmas) who sell homemade orecchiette on the streets of the old town. The grandmas earn little for selling small packets of the stuff to individual buyers. Had they secretly banded together to sell on a more industrial scale? Their artisanal trade is now in danger of being regulated by the authorities in a battle that pits old traditions against modern regulation. We have our money on le nonne and our fork in a bowl of orecchiette con cime di rapa.

Carbon has a bad rep, but did you know it's a building block of life? As atoms evolved, carbon trapped in CO2 was freed, giving way to the creation of complex molecules that use photosynthesis to convert carbon to food. Soon after, plants, herbivores, and carnivores began populating the earth and the cycle of life began.

Learn more about how carbon created life on Earth in the second episode of Eni's Story of CO2 series.

As we enter the homestretch of the US presidential election — which is set to be the most contentious, and possibly contested, in generations — Americans are also voting on 35 seats up for grabs in a battle for the control of the Senate. The 100-member body is currently held 53-47 by the Republican Party, but many individual races are wide open, and the Democrats are confident they can flip the upper chamber of Congress.

Either way, the result will have a profound impact not only on domestic policy, but also on US foreign relations and other issues with global reach. Here are a few areas where what US senators decide reverberates well beyond American shores.

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On September 23, GZERO Media — in partnership with Microsoft and Eurasia Group — gathered global experts to discuss global recovery from the coronavirus pandemic in a livestream panel. Our panel for the discussion Crisis Response & Recovery: Reimagining while Rebuilding, included:

  • Brad Smith, President, Microsoft
  • Ian Bremmer, President and Founder, Eurasia Group & GZERO Media
  • Jeh Johnson, Partner, Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, LLP and former Secretary of Homeland Security.
  • John Frank, Vice President, UN Affairs at Microsoft
  • Susan Glasser, staff writer and Washington columnist, The New Yorker (moderator)

Special appearances by UN Secretary-General António Guterres, European Central Bank chief Christine Lagarde, and comedian/host Trevor Noah.

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Jon Lieber, who leads Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, offers insights on the Supreme Court vacancy:

Will Senate Republicans, who stopped a Supreme Court nomination in 2016, because it was too close to an election, pay a political price for the change in tactics this time around?

Not only do I think they won't pay a political price, I think in many cases, they're going to benefit. Changing the balance of power on the Supreme Court has been a career-long quest for many conservatives and many Republicans. And that's why you've seen so many of them fall in line behind the President's nomination before we even know who it is.

At this point, do Senate Democrats have any hope of stopping President Trump from filling the ninth seat on the Supreme Court?

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In a special GZERO Media livestream on global response and recovery amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Eurasia Group & GZERO Media president Ian Bremmer discussed the difference between Europe's unified approach to economic stimulus and the deeply divided and political nature of the current conversation in the US. While initial stimulus support was bipartisan, there is little chance of Democrats and Republicans coming together again ahead of the November 3 presidential election. "It's red state versus blue state. President Trump's saying that coronavirus isn't so bad if you take the blue states out. He's president of the blue states, you can't take the blue states out," Bremmer told moderator Susan Glasser of The New Yorker.

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Panel: How will the world recover from COVID-19?

UNGA Livestream