What We're Watching: Macron unfazed

Macron not backing down over pensions – Despite six days of mass unrest that has paralyzed Paris' public transport system and dented both tourism and Christmas retail, the government will stand firm on a proposal to reform and unify the country's 42 different pension plans. France's pension system, one of the most generous of any major industrialized country, has major budget shortfalls that contribute to the country's ballooning deficit. Last year, Macron abandoned a proposed fuel price hike that ignited the Yellow Vest movement. But overhauling France's "welfare state" was central to his 2017 election platform, and acquiescing to protesters this time around would be political suicide. France's prime minister – tapped to lead the pension reform project – is expected to announce the plan's final details tomorrow. We're watching to see how this might escalate things further.


The future of Muslim migrants in India – India's parliament is currently debating a controversial bill that would open a new path to Indian citizenship for migrants from Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Bangladesh— provided that they are not Muslims. Supporters of the measure say it offers safe haven to persecuted minorities from those countries, but critics say playing religious favorites violates the secular principles of the Indian state. Since first coming to power in 2014, Prime Minister Narendra Modi's Hindu nationalist BJP party and its hardline affiliates have taken steps to boost the primacy of Hinduism in India's public life, creating a climate of deepening uncertainty for the country's 200 million Muslims.

Saudi Arabia ends restaurant gender segregation – In a landmark decision Sunday, Saudi Arabia scrapped a decades-old rule that required restaurants to segregate seating areas and entrances according to sex and marital status. Over the past two years, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) – the country's de facto leader and the first from a new generation– has led a major effort to liberalize Saudi Arabia's extremely conservative society, lifting restrictions on women driving, welcoming in movie theaters for the first time in decades, and permitting women to travel without their male relatives' approval. But these moves have been accompanied by a sustained crackdown on dissent – in many cases, the authorities have targeted precisely the women who fought for some of the freedoms recently granted.

What We're Eating

Grandma's Little Ears – Earlier this year, the Times reports, a restaurant in the southern Italian city of Bari illegally received a large shipment of orecchiette, the "little ear" pasta native to the area, without recording where it came from. This violated strict EU and Italian laws on food origin. Suspicion immediately fell on an unlikely target: le nonne (the grandmas) who sell homemade orecchiette on the streets of the old town. The grandmas earn little for selling small packets of the stuff to individual buyers. Had they secretly banded together to sell on a more industrial scale? Their artisanal trade is now in danger of being regulated by the authorities in a battle that pits old traditions against modern regulation. We have our money on le nonne and our fork in a bowl of orecchiette con cime di rapa.

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As the coronavirus pandemic has plunged much of the world economy into turmoil, you've probably heard a lot about what might happen to "supply chains," the vast networks of manufacturing and shipping that help create and deliver all those plastic toys, iPhones, cars, pills, pants, yogurt, and N95 face-masks you've been waiting on.

The future of global supply chains is an especially important question for China, the world's manufacturing powerhouse. Some countries and companies now worry about relying too much on any single supplier for consumer and medical goods, let alone one where the government hid the first evidence of what became a global pandemic and sometimes enforces trade and investment rules in seemingly arbitrary ways. The US-China trade war — and the vulnerabilities it reveals for manufacturers — certainly don't help.

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Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Got through the Fourth of July. Pretty rough one for 2020 here in the United States. Still in the thick of it as we see caseload exploding in the United States. But really, the virus is all about developing markets right now. Poor countries around the world very soon, with the exception of the US and the UK, all of the top 10 countries around the world in terms of coronavirus caseload will be poorer countries. Let's keep in mind, these are countries that test a lot less, which means the actual numbers, in the United States the experts are saying probable likelihood of total cases is about 10x what we've actually seen in the US, in emerging markets and most of them, it's more like between 20 and 100. In other words, this is really where the virus now is.

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Many countries around the world — mostly democracies in the Americas, Asia, and Europe — have condemned China's recent move to implement a draconian new security law for Hong Kong that in effect ends the autonomy granted to the territory when it reverted from British control to Chinese rule in 1997. However, last week 52 countries expressed support for China's decision at the UN Human Rights Commission in Geneva. Most of these countries either owe China a lot of money or are relatively authoritarian regimes themselves — but not all of them. Here's a look at the China-debt exposure and freedom rankings of the countries that took Beijing's side on the new Hong Kong law.

0: The trial in the 2018 killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi opened in a Turkish court on Friday, but 0 of the 20 Saudi agents accused of the gruesome murder were actually in the courtroom. Saudi Arabia says its own closed-door trial over the slaying was sufficient, and has so far refused to extradite the suspects to Turkey, where Khashoggi was killed.

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