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The Coronavirus politicized: reopening America

Ben White, Chief Economic Correspondent for Politico, provides his perspective on the coronavirus-related news in US politics:

With Trump's recent call to liberate locked down states, is reopening America becoming a political issue?

Unfortunately, yes, it is. Trump at his briefings defers to the governors. Talks about phased reopenings. Seems to heed the medical guidance. But at same time, tweets about liberating states setting up these protests, which only serve to put people at risk who are protesting and those who have to respond to it.


Where is the US at in its coronavirus response? Are we flattening the curve?

Yes, we're flattening the curve, particularly in hard hit areas like New York. Big question is, what's next? How do we reopen and how do we do it without enough tests and enough contact tracing? It's not clear we're anywhere close to that point, yet. There seems to be almost no election talk right now given the coronavirus pandemic.

How will this change the presidential election?

Well, it's going to compress it significantly. It was always going to be a referendum on Donald Trump. Now, even more so, given his coronavirus response. Hard to campaign in this environment. We'll see a very compressed election campaign as we close in on November.

Empathy and listening are key to establishing harmonious relationships, as demonstrated by Callista Azogu, GM of Human Resources & Organization for Nigerian Agip Oil Company (NAOC), an Eni subsidiary in Abuja. "To build trust is very difficult. To destroy it is very easy," says Callista, whose busy days involve everything from personnel issues to union relationships. She sees great potential for her native Nigeria not only because of the country's natural resources, but because of its vibrant and creative people.

Learn more about Callista in this episode of Faces of Eni.

For the world's wealthiest nations, including the United States, the rollout of COVID-19 vaccine has been rocky, to say the least. And as a result, much of the developing world will have to wait even longer for their turn. Part of the challenge, World Bank President David Malpass says, is that "advanced economies have reserved a lot of the vaccine doses." Malpass sat down with Ian Bremmer recently to talk about what his organization is doing to try to keep millions around the world from slipping deeper into poverty during the pandemic. Their conversation was part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Saturday will mark the beginning of an historic turning point for European politics as 1,001 voting members of Germany's Christian Democratic Union, the party of Chancellor Angela Merkel, hold an online conference to elect a new leader.

Here are the basic facts:

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For the first time in twenty years, extreme poverty around the world is growing. How does the developing world recover from a pandemic that has brought even the richest nations to their knees? David Malpass, the President of the World Bank, is tasked with answering that question. He joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to talk about how his organization is trying to keep the developing world from slipping further into poverty in the wake of a once-in-a-century pandemic.

Joe Biden wants to move into the White House, but the coast isn't clear. He may need some bleach.

Watch more PUPPET REGIME here.

The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

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