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Fighting On All Fronts: Trump's In The Ring

Fighting On All Fronts: Trump's In The Ring

“The American people elected a fighter,” White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders once said. Granted that was in defense of a Presidential tweet about a facelift, but Trump’s style is nothing if not confident and confrontational. It’s hard to think of a modern president who has (mostly by choice) had to fight on so many fronts, with such a low approval rating, and just one year of government experience.


Here’s a partial list of Trump’s biggest upcoming throwdowns:

Trade: Uncertain renegotiations of NAFTA and the free trade deal with South Korea are underway, while tensions with China are set to grow as Trump takes a harder line on Beijing’s trade practices and tries to shrink the trade deficit.

Geopolitics: Rocket Man and the Mullahs — killer band name, also two of the most serious foreign policy challenges in store for Trump this year. North Korea won’t budge on its nukes (see above), and Washington’s bid to roll back Iranian influence in the Middle East and potentially revise the Iran deal would have been main events even before Trump egged on anti-regime protests in the country last week.

Domestic: Whatever Bob Mueller manages to find (or not) on Trump will likely come to light this year, and don’t forget that Trump’s low approval rating could put his Congressional majority at risk in the November midterm elections. Bonus round: the fissures within the GOP that we wrote about a few weeks ago have gotten even more intriguing with the political defenestration of Sloppy Steve Bannon.

Empathy and listening are key to establishing harmonious relationships, as demonstrated by Callista Azogu, GM of Human Resources & Organization for Nigerian Agip Oil Company (NAOC), an Eni subsidiary in Abuja. "To build trust is very difficult. To destroy it is very easy," says Callista, whose busy days involve everything from personnel issues to union relationships. She sees great potential for her native Nigeria not only because of the country's natural resources, but because of its vibrant and creative people.

Learn more about Callista in this episode of Faces of Eni.

For the world's wealthiest nations, including the United States, the rollout of COVID-19 vaccine has been rocky, to say the least. And as a result, much of the developing world will have to wait even longer for their turn. Part of the challenge, World Bank President David Malpass says, is that "advanced economies have reserved a lot of the vaccine doses." Malpass sat down with Ian Bremmer recently to talk about what his organization is doing to try to keep millions around the world from slipping deeper into poverty during the pandemic. Their conversation was part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Saturday will mark the beginning of an historic turning point for European politics as 1,001 voting members of Germany's Christian Democratic Union, the party of Chancellor Angela Merkel, hold an online conference to elect a new leader.

Here are the basic facts:

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For the first time in twenty years, extreme poverty around the world is growing. How does the developing world recover from a pandemic that has brought even the richest nations to their knees? David Malpass, the President of the World Bank, is tasked with answering that question. He joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to talk about how his organization is trying to keep the developing world from slipping further into poverty in the wake of a once-in-a-century pandemic.

Joe Biden wants to move into the White House, but the coast isn't clear. He may need some bleach.

Watch more PUPPET REGIME here.

The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

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