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Oct 7 panel on digital inclusion in the workforce

Digital Inclusion: Activating Skills for the Next Billion Jobs. Watch the livestream on 10/7 11am EDT. Panel: Kate Behncken, Rohitesh Dhawan, Lisa Lewin, Dominique Hyde, Parag Mehta, Sherrell Dorsey. Presented by GZERO Media, Microsoft, Eurasia Group.

Teaching digital skills could empower the workforce the 21st century needs, especially in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis.

On Wednesday, October 7th at 11a ET/8a PT/4p BST, GZERO Media — in partnership with Microsoft and Eurasia Group — presented a live panel discussion, "Digital Inclusion: Connectivity and Skills for the Next Billion Jobs," about the acceleration of digitalization, the changing workforce, and the need for digital access for all.

The conversation was moderated by Sherrell Dorsey, founder and CEO of The Plug, and our panel included:

  • Kate Behncken, Vice President, Microsoft Philanthropies
  • Lisa Lewin, CEO of General Assembly
  • Parag Mehta, Executive Director and Sr Vice President, Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth
  • Dominique Hyde, Director External Relations, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
  • Rohitesh Dhawan, Managing Director, Energy, Climate & Resources, Eurasia Group
Also featured: a special appearance by Michelle Bachelet, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and former president of Chile.

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Go to https://www.gzeromedia.com/unga/livestream/ to watch our livestream events. (No registration required.)

For more information, read our explainer on Digital inclusion: Activating skills for the next billion jobs, part of our coverage of the most pressing issues facing the 2020 United Nations General Assembly, and watch this video.

Internet Connectivity & the Need for Digital Inclusion: Access, Training, Skills, Jobs | GZERO Media youtu.be

Digital Inclusion: Activating Skills for the Next Billion Jobs: Wednesday, October 7th, 11a ET/8a PT/4p BST

Microsoft announced earlier this year the launch of a new United Nations representation office to deepen their support for the UN's mission and work. Many of the big challenges facing society can only be addressed effectively through multi-stakeholder action. Whether it's public health, environmental sustainability, cybersecurity, terrorist content online or the UN's Sustainable Development Goals, Microsoft has found that progress requires two elements - international cooperation among governments and inclusive initiatives that bring in civil society and private sector organizations to collaborate on solutions. Microsoft provided an update on their mission, activities for the 75th UN General Assembly, and the team. To read the announcement from Microsoft's Vice President of UN Affairs, John Frank, visit Microsoft On The Issues.

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