HARD NUMBERS

18,016: So far this year, 18,016 migrants have arrived to Spain across the Mediterranean, outpacing the numbers for Italy and Greece. Could Spain be the next flash point in Europe’s ongoing political saga over migration?


200: Chinese government-affiliated outlets print or broadcast their content in at least 200 foreign publication around the world, according an investigation from the Financial Times. The reach of China’s global propaganda machine rivals that of almost all of the world’s largest news organization.

149: A recent attack on an election rally in Pakistan killed 149 people, making it one of the deadliest in the country’s history. That has only heightened tensions as the country gears up for an election next week that heralds only the second democratic transition of power in its history.

137: More than half of workers in Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines, amounting to at least 137 million people in total, could lose their jobs because of automation within the next two decades, according to a report from the International Labor Organization.

2: France’s thrilling World Cup victory has done wonders for national morale— with 62 percent of those polled the day after the final saying they’re now optimistic about the future, up from 53 percent last year. French President Emmanuel Macron, on the other hand, has seen the percentage of those saying he’s a “good” president slip by 2 points since Les Bleus brought home the win.

It was inevitable that Prime Minister Narendra Modi would make India's elections a referendum on Narendra Modi, and now that the vast majority of 600 million votes cast have been counted, it's clear he made the right call.

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Among the 23 men and women now seeking the Democratic Party's nomination to take on Donald Trump in next year's election, the frontrunner, at least for now, has spent half a century in politics. Former Vice President Joe Biden, first elected to the US Senate in 1972, is the very epitome of the American political establishment.

Yet, the dominant political trend in many democracies today is public rejection of traditional candidates and parties of the center-right and center-left in favor of new movements, voices, and messages. Consider the evidence from some recent elections:

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It's Friday, and Signal readers deserve at least one entirely upbeat news story.

José Obdulio Gaviria, a Colombian senator for the rightwing Democratic Center party, is an outspoken opponent of government attempts to make peace with the FARC rebel group after 50 years of conflict.

On his way into a meeting earlier this week, Gaviria collapsed. It was later reported that he had fainted as a result of low blood pressure probably caused by complications following recent open heart surgery.

A political rival, Senator Julian Gallo, quickly came to his rescue and revived him using resuscitation skills he learned as—irony alert—a FARC guerrilla. CPR applied by Gallo helped Gaviria regain consciousness, before another senator, who is also professional doctor, took over. Gaviria was taken to hospital and appears to have recovered.

Because some things will always be more important than politics.