Join our livestream panel Wed 9/16: Net Zero: Climate Ambition and Action

Join our livestream panel Wed 9/16: Net Zero: Climate Ambition and Action

On Wednesday, September 16th, GZERO Media — in partnership with Microsoft and Eurasia Group — kicks off a series of livestream discussions about the most important issues facing the 75th UN General Assembly. The first event, Net Zero: Climate Ambition and Action, will consider how we get to net zero emissions.

Our panel will be moderated by Julia Pyper, host and producer of the Political Climate podcast, and will include Gerald Butts, Vice Chairman & Senior Advisor, Eurasia Group; Lucas Joppa, Chief Environmental Officer, Microsoft; Rachel Kyte, Dean of The Fletcher School, Tufts University; and Mark Carney, Finance Adviser to the UK Prime Minister for COP 26 and UN Special Envoy for Climate Action and Finance.

On the day of the event, visit https://www.gzeromedia.com/unga/livestream to view the livestream presentation.

Net Zero: Climate Ambition and Action: Wednesday, September 16th, 12:30p ET/9:30a PT/5:30p BST

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