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The Power of Crisis | GZERO World

Is this crisis big enough? How crises can force solutions

Vladimir Putin’s war in Ukraine hasn’t gone to plan, BUT he has achieved something nearly unimaginable: get US Republicans and Democrats to agree on something.

And it's not just a US problem. Trust in government has plummeted all around the world, to the point that this has becoming the defining story of our era. That's why international institutions like the UN or the IMF are no longer fit for purpose.

To fix this broken system, we need a crisis. For instance, a pandemic, climate change, or Big Tech.

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War in Ukraine Sets Energy Transition on "Hyperdrive" | Global Stage | GZERO Media

War in Ukraine sets energy transition in "hyperdrive"

GZERO Media caught up with Microsoft's Chief Environmental Officer Lucas Joppa at the World Economic Forum in Davos to discuss ways to keep nations focused on climate change amid the converging crises of war and pandemic.

Tony Maciulis: When you have these very immediate and acute crises happening concurrently like pandemic and now of course the war in Ukraine, has it been a challenge to keep the focus on climate change?

Lucas Joppa: I would say yes and no. It's a challenge because obviously these are crises in and of themselves and they need to be dealt with and focused on. But on the other hand, I think that these crises, what they've done is they've really shown society that we have things that are going to happen to us. And if we know that they are coming, it would behoove us to do something about them now to prepare for it now. The biggest thing that we have coming for us is the impacts of a rapidly changing global climate system. It's front and center of our minds. We know we have to get out and do something about it. And so on the one hand, yes, we're focusing on these crises, but it hasn't shifted focus off of climate either.

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Davos 2022: A World of Geopolitical Conflicts & Security Issues | Europe In :60 | GZERO Media

A different Davos amid geopolitical conflicts and security issues

Carl Bildt, former prime minister of Sweden shares his view from the 2022 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

What are the topics and discussions going on in Davos, this year?

It's a very different Davos. It's fewer people. There are obviously no Russians. They are banned from here, rightly so. There are hardly any Chinese. And a lot of the discussion is, of course, where is the world heading? This is not the world that Davos wanted to create. It's a world of geopolitical conflicts. It's a world of security issues. But it's a world where we still need to come together and see if we can find common solution on the green transition, on the digital issues, and after all, also on peace and war.

Ukraine War Dominates Davos Discussions | World In :60 | GZERO Media

Ukraine war dominates Davos discussions

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60 from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Is the Russia-Ukraine war dominating the conversation in Davos?

Yes, it is. There is only one side of the conversation here. Not true globally, but in Davos, there are no Russian delegates. And I mean, frankly, pretty much every single person attending is saying as much as they can in favor of Ukraine. You see a lot of people kind of dressing the part and certainly you're in Europe. And so as a consequence, the fact that this is a war in Europe that ends the peace dividend, it's been topic number one, topic number two, topic number three. Kept me pretty busy, frankly.

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Hope as Major Crises Intersect | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Hope as major crises intersect

To fix our broken international political system, we need a crisis. For instance, a pandemic, climate change, or Big Tech having too much power.

But it must be a crisis that's so destructive it forces us to respond fast, and together — like World War II.

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer talks to Anne-Marie Slaughter, former US State Department official and now CEO of New America, and political scientist and Harvard professor Stephen Walt about the Ukraine war and other crises.

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Luisa Vieira

What We’re Watching: Water wars vs. cooperation

Water wars?

Hundreds of millions of both Indians and Pakistanis depend on water from the Indus River for drinking, farming, and hydropower. The Indus Waters Treaty, signed by India’s prime minister and Pakistan’s president in 1960, guarantees how water from the river and its tributaries will be shared. This was put at risk in February 2019, when a suicide car bomb killed more than 40 Indian soldiers in the Indian-controlled sector of Kashmir. India’s transport minister responded with plans to “stop our share of water which used to flow to Pakistan.” The Pakistani government then warned it would treat any stoppage of water as an “act of war.” A treaty loses its values if one side decides not to honor it. Though tensions cooled in this case, the risk of a water war remains, because it’s simply too dangerous for these nuclear-armed and bitter rivals to fight a war with conventional weapons, and water will only become a more precious resource in coming years. Global warming could shrink the Himalayan glaciers that feed the river by more than a third in coming decades and make rainfall patterns more erratic, even as Indian and Pakistan water demand increases with population growth.

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The Crisis We Need | Quick Take | GZERO Media

Ian Bremmer: power of the "Goldilocks crisis"

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take: Hi everybody, Ian Bremmer here. I have a Quick Take to kick off your week. And this week, you know what's coming. It's my new book. It's called The Power of Crisis. It is right here and it's coming out tomorrow. I certainly hope you'll get a copy.

But I thought I'd tease you with some of the big arguments that I'm trying to make in this book, because it's no surprise, this is a target rich environment for global crises. We've gotten through this two plus year pandemic. Now, it's still a huge problem in China and North Korea. We've got a new Cold War with the Russians, the invasion of Ukraine and confrontation with NATO. We've got climate change and over a billion Indians suffering massive heat stress, and that's only going to get worse going forward.

We also have disruptive technologies, which are increasingly hard to contain and in the hands of rogue states and even non-state actors, and what are we going to do about that? This is a book that is not saying the wheels are coming off. It's not saying the sky is falling, but rather it's saying, how do we take advantage of these crises to deal with a world that has become more anxiety inducing? And indeed made a lot of people feel like we're stuck, and the outcomes are inevitable and governments are never going to work.

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A woman puts water on her face to get relief from extreme heat during hot weather in Kolkata, India.

Debajyoti Chakraborty via Reuters

We need to talk about wet bulb weather

Millions of Indians are suffering through one of the country’s worst heat waves in over a century.

Temperatures in India throughout April passed 60 degrees Celsius (140 degrees Fahrenheit) – a hell on earth that the Washington Post says is "testing the limits of human survival.” India’s meteorology department, meanwhile, has warned that the country is likely to continue to fry throughout May.

The problem is that residents can’t sweat it out – literally. India is not only experiencing soaring temperatures, but also soaring humidity levels, giving rise to a phenomenon known as wet bulb conditions. This occurs when temperatures exceed 88 degrees Fahrenheit and humidity is over 95%.

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