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US election seen from South Korea: "US has lost its reputation"

Woo Jung Yeop is a research fellow at Sejong Institute in South Korea. Our conversation has been edited for length and clarity.

Carlos Santamaria: What are a few ways you think the US election might impact South Korea?

WJY: Not only the South Korean government, but most people in South Korea view the US election this time through mainly three issues. First is how a Trump second term or a new Biden administration will approach North Korea. Second, how each would approach the alliance issue. And third, how the new US government would approach US-China relations, because that will affect South Korea's geopolitical position in the next four years.

Those three areas could be affected by the result of the election in November. That is why South Korea has a very keen interest in the outcome.

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RNC 2020 takeaways; Russian poisoning; South Korea's schools; Kim Jong-un rumors

Watch Ian Bremmer discuss the World In more than 60 Seconds:

What are your takeaways from night one of the RNC?

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North Korea blows up the relationship. Why?

First, they stop taking your calls. Then they blow up the house. But this isn't a love affair gone wrong, it's what's happening right now along one of the tensest borders in the world, between North and South Korea. Last week Pyongyang quit answering a daily phone call from the South that was set up in 2018 to keep the peace and further reconciliation. Then, yesterday, North Korea quite literally blew up a building just north of the border which both sides had used for the past two years as a meeting place for officials from the North and the South.

Why now?

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Trump and police reform; India-China tension; North and South Korea

Ian Bremmer on this week's World In (More Than) 60 Seconds:

Number one: What police reform will result from Trump's executive order?

Well, on the one hand, it is a recognition that very strong and across the board, pretty bipartisan support in the United States for police reform. And so, he has to respond. And he can respond. I mean, the fact is that one of the most broadly supported bipartisan policies in the US that has come out of the Trump administration was penal reform.

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What We're Watching: Mistake in Bolivia, missed call in Korea, and will US troops ditch Germany?

Oops! Maybe there wasn't fraud in Bolivia's election: In October 2018, thousands of Bolivians flocked to the streets to protest irregularities in the re-election of long-serving leftwing President Evo Morales, the nation's first president of indigenous origin. After the independent Organization of American States (OAS) supported those claims, Morales was pushed out of office by the military, and fled to Mexico. But now, Latin America experts at the University of Pennsylvania say that their own research into the contentious ballot fails to support the OAS' findings. The allegation that Morales' cronies interfered with the vote counts and rigged ballots was based on incorrect data and flawed statistical modeling, the researchers say. The new findings do not, importantly, prove that Bolivia's elections were held in a manner that would be considered "free and fair." Still, the OAS blunder, if true, is a big deal: since Morales left the country, a rightwing caretaker government, led by Jeanine Áñez, has cracked down on Morales supporters and postponed fresh elections. Bolivia's parliament recently passed a law compelling Áñez to hold a new vote by August. Morales, for his part, said he will not run in the do-over election, but his handpicked successor is leading in the polls.

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