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On Dr. Seuss and cancel culture

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Hey everybody. Ian Bremmer here. Welcome to your week, life looking better every day in the United States, coronavirus land. But I thought I'd talk about, this week, all of this cancel culture that everyone's talking about right now. If you're on the wrong political side, your opponents are trying to shut you down and you take massive umbrage. I see this everywhere, and it's starting to annoy.

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Republican civil war

"There's no question, none — that President Trump is practically and morally responsible for provoking" the January 6 Capitol building riot. That attack was the "foreseeable consequence of the crescendo of false statements, conspiracy theories and reckless hyperbole, which the defeated president kept shouting into the largest megaphone on the Earth."

So said Kentucky's Mitch McConnell, US Senate Republican leader since 2006, just after voting last Saturday to acquit the president of high crimes and misdemeanors following Trump's Senate impeachment trial.

On Tuesday, Trump punched back. "Mitch is a dour, sullen, and unsmiling political hack, and if Republican Senators are going to stay with him, they will not win again." On Thursday, the pro-Trump chairman of Kentucky's Republican Party called on McConnell to resign as Republican leader.

The battle is joined.

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The GOP siding with Trump is hardly a threat to democracy

Columnist Max Boot writes in The Washington Post that by humoring Trump, the GOP is enabling authoritarianism. Ian Bremmer and Eurasia Group's Jon Lieber take out The Red Pen to argue that, while disappointing, the kowtowing is unlikely to damage US democracy.

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Why won't Trump and the GOP concede defeat?

Four days after major media outlets called the US presidential election race in Joe Biden's favor, Donald Trump and the GOP leadership haven't conceded the president's defeat. Trump insists that the election was stolen from him.

The votes that put Biden ahead, he says, were either cast or counted illegally. And though he has provided no evidence to support these claims so far, his lawyers are pursuing his legal right to try. Meanwhile, Attorney General William Barr, departing from the Justice Department's established tradition of staying out of electoral politics, has authorized his department to look into allegations of fraud. Republican Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell has refused to recognize Biden as president-elect and supports the President's right to go to court.

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Countdown to the (possibly contested) US election

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Normalcy is incrementally coming to the United States, if not yet to a lot of developing markets, but certainly to Europe, certainly to China. And I haven't spent a lot of time talking about the US election yet, certainly nothing close to the media coverage. I thought I would today because we've got 99 days until November 3rd. You say 100 days yesterday, sounds like a bigger deal, but that's only because we have a base 10 numeric system. If we had a base three numeric system, 99 days out would be pretty meaningful, right? But no, I thought let's finally, right, we've got these massive, incredibly expensive, billions of dollars spent, a year and a half of the entire process, I mean, by far a greater subversion of democracy, the way the US elections are held than any other advanced industrial democracy in the world. We all know it. Democrats, Republicans, people sick of the party system. We all recognize nothing can be done about it. It's fantastic for special interests that spend an immense amount of money trying to ensure that candidates do their bidding. But now that we are only 99 days out, political polls really do start to matter. We know who the candidates are on both sides. We don't yet have the V.P. on the Biden side. But still, I mean, we're pretty close. 100 days out, 99 days out, you feel like you can start paying attention.

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Sen. Chris Coons on His Favorite Republican and Favorite T-shirt

In a GZERO World "Lightning Round," Sen. Chris Coons (D-DE) reveals which Biden 2020 T-shirt is his favorite to work out in, who among GOP colleagues in the Senate he is closest with, where he stands on DC statehood, and (sort of) who he would have voted for if Joe Biden hadn't won the nomination. Spoiler alert: It is not Marianne Williamson.

The politics of a pandemic: interview with Sen. Chris Coons

Ian Bremmer is examining the state of U.S. response and recovery six months into the pandemic. Sen. Chris Coons (D-DE) joins to discuss what Congress has done to provide economic relief to businesses and people impacted by the unexpected and unprecedented downturn, and next steps still to come. He also takes jabs at GOP Congressional colleagues who he says have "followed (Trump's) lead rather than science."

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Meet Jon Lieber, our new host of US Politics In 60 Seconds

Presidential race, pandemic, protests... Sometimes the news cycle moves so quickly that it's hard to make sense of it all.

Meet Jon Lieber, U.S. Managing Director for Eurasia Group. With extensive experience on Capitol Hill, he's advised senior elected officials and covered policy for years. Join him, every week, as he cuts through the noise and shares updates on what you need to know in just one minute. This is "U.S. Politics In 60 Seconds."

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