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Paige Fusco

If the economy is so good, why does it seem so bad?

The US economy grew 5.7% in 2021, the biggest annual growth rate in decades, yet at the beginning of 2022, less than a third of Americans thought it was strong. As the world confronts the converging crises of the lingering pandemic and war in Ukraine, inflation and skyrocketing prices are further contributing to feelings of financial insecurity around the globe.

The latest episode of Living Beyond Borders, a special podcast series from GZERO brought to you by Citi Private Bank, takes a look at why there is still reason for optimism, and what we can expect from US and global markets over the next year. Moderated by Shari Friedman, managing director of climate and sustainability at Eurasia Group, the discussion features David Bailin, chief investment officer and global head of investments at Citi Global Wealth, and Robert Kahn, director of global macroeconomics at Eurasia Group.

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The Graphic Truth: Americans sour on economy

According to several indicators, the US economy is doing fine. Joblessness, for instance, is way down, with fewer Americans collecting unemployment benefits than at any time since the 1970s. Still, inflation has caused the cost of food and fuel in the US to soar to a 40-year high. Polling shows that Americans’ sense of financial security and economic stability is waning – a massive problem for President Joe Biden ahead of the midterm elections. Biden says American companies should help tackle inflation by lowering costs, not wages. But Fed Chair Jerome Powell signaled plans to take action this week, raising expectations of an interest rate hike in May. We take a look at US consumer confidence, which reflects general sentiment about the state of the economy, since 2000.

Rising Energy Prices Will Test American Patience for Ukraine War | US Politics In :60 | GZERO Media

Rising gas prices will test US resolve on Russian sanctions

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, shares his perspective on the US ban on Russian oil imports.

Today, Biden announced a ban on Russian oil imports. What will this mean for Americans in the near-term?

Well, prices have already rocketed at the pump in result of the Russian invasion in Ukraine and the incredible sanctions that the US and the EU have put on Russia as a result. The average price for a retail gallon of gas has gone up 55 cents just in the last week, and it's likely to escalate even further with today's announcements, potentially reaching $5 or even $6 a gallon. This is unprecedented in the US and hearkens back to the energy price shocks of the 1970s that led to an inflationary price spiral that took years for the US economy to unwind. The Biden administration's signaling this is not the end of their escalation against Russia and is preparing the American people to bear some of the costs of these incredible actions.

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US Ban on Russian Oil Imports Could Make NATO Alliance Look Weaker | World In :60 | GZERO Media

US ban on Russian oil imports not coordinated with NATO allies

What are the ramifications of the US ban on Russian oil imports? Are there any surprises on Russia's released list of unfriendly countries? Also, is President Xi facing a hard wartime choice for China? Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

First of all, what are the ramifications of the US ban on Russian oil imports?

A couple of things. First of all, the United States doesn't really get much oil at all from Russia. Oil product is a different story. Interesting to see where exactly that lands but it's definitely a significant message from the United States. Last week, the Americans weren't planning on that but given a lot of domestic pressure, including from Congress, the Biden administration decided to move on it. One problem I see is that this was not well coordinated with the Europeans, almost every other message so far in response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine has been incredibly strong coordination between the Americans and the NATO allies. That is not the case here. And I think that is a challenge. The Europeans are not going to be willing or able to go nearly as far as the Americans because they have a hell of a lot more to lose and that potentially makes the NATO alliance look a little bit weaker on this issue. They're going to need to communicate well on it.

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Ray Dalio; Is China on the Rise, & the US in Decline? | GZERO World

The US-China economic competition is heating up, says investor Ray Dalio

The Chinese think they are on the rise, while America is declining. On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer talks to billionaire Ray Dalio, head of the world's largest hedge fund, who thinks rising US debt, a widening wealth gap among Americans, and the meteoric rise of China all play into Beijing's plans to overtake the US as a global superpower.

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Should Investors Bet on China Over US? | GZERO World

Should investors bet on China over the US?

Hard to say these days, even for a billionaire hedge-fund manager like Ray Dalio.

On the one hand, America has a better system, better tech, and better universities. On the other hand, China "has us outnumbered" in population and pace of per capita income growth.

China, he explains, has not only become a powerful competitor. The US has changed, too.

"[The] America that I remember is a different, uh, and grew up with is a different America than it exists today in terms of like equal opportunity and the American dream."

Watch the GZERO World episode: Does China's rise have to mean America's decline?

Ian Explains: America Down, China Up | GZERO World

Is the US in decline while China’s power grows?

Who said last year that the biggest source of chaos in the present-day world is the US?

Not the leader of Russia. Not of North Korea. Not even of Iran.

It was Xi Jinping, who believes America poses a major risk for China.

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Want to Fix US Political Division? Narrow the Wealth Gap, Says Investor Ray Dalio | GZERO World

Want to fix US political division? Narrow the wealth gap, says investor Ray Dalio

What happened on January 6, 2021, did not at all surprise billionaire investor Ray Dalio.

History, he says, shows that both right-wing and left-wing populism begins to gain power when there's a large wealth gap.

So, what comes next?

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