{{ subpage.title }}

Ousted Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan travels on a vehicle to lead a protest march in Islamabad, Pakistan.

REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

What We're Watching: Imran Khan's threat, a looming global recession, Bolsonaro-Biden meeting

Imran Khan issues dangerous ultimatum

Pakistan’s former Prime Minister Imran Khan – booted from the top job last month by a parliamentary no-confidence vote – has called on the country’s nascent government to hold new elections within six days or risk full-blown social upheaval. For weeks, Khan has been whipping supporters of his Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf Party into a frenzy, saying his ouster was perniciously orchestrated by Washington in conjunction with the newly minted PM Shehbaz Sharif. (Khan, of course, fails to acknowledge that his removal was in large part a reflection of dissatisfaction with the country’s imploding economy and dwindling foreign reserves.) Things got really bad this week when Khan led his supporters in a march from his home turf of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province toward Islamabad. As throngs of angry PTI supporters tried to reach the capital, violent clashes with police ensued in multiple cities. The Supreme Court ordered police to remove barriers on highways that were preventing pro-Khan protesters from reaching Islamabad but said that protests in the capital needed to be confined to a specific area. That didn’t happen, and police responded to the violence and disorder with tear gas. This turmoil comes as Sharif is trying to convince the International Monetary Fund that Pakistan has gotten its act together to get funding back on track. Khan isn’t backing down, and the next week could be deadly.

Read Now Show less
Ian Bremmer: Live from Davos | World Economic Forum 2022 | Quick Take | GZERO Media

"Crisis-rich" WEF 2022: on ending war in Ukraine & redistributing wealth

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take: Hey everybody, Ian Bremmer here, and I'm in Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum. It is springtime. It's not the way it's supposed to work, but it is the first live forum in person since the pandemic hit. I'd say it's pretty well attended. About 80% of the folks you would normally expect to see here, almost all the CEOs, a lot of heads of state, government delegations, and of course, a lot of public intellectuals, but who you're not seeing, there's not one Russian in attendance. No corporates, no governments, no delegates. And that is because of the invasion into Ukraine three months ago. They were removed from the agenda. There's a lot being talked about right now.

Read Now Show less

S3 Episode 3: Will there be a recession?

Listen: As record inflation meets rising interest rates, we’re examining the role of the US Federal Reserve in protecting the economy from recession in the coming months.

15 years ago the world faced the largest financial crisis since the Great Depression, brought on by a perfect storm of risky lending, mortgage defaults, and failures of financial institutions. In January 2008, the Fed made significant cuts to interest rates to stimulate the economy. Those rates have stayed historically low since then, but that’s rapidly changing.

Read Now Show less

S3 Episode 2: Saving the world’s water supply


Listen: Nearly half of the world's population currently lives in areas that face water scarcity for at least one month out of every year, and more than 1.2 billion people lack access to clean drinking water. This basic human need is too often at risk for communities around the globe, creating grave public health and security crises.

Read Now Show less
Ian Explains: Russia's War in Ukraine is Starving the World | GZERO World

Russia's war in Ukraine is starving the world

Ukraine is an agricultural powerhouse. But so is Russia. Between the two they account for almost a third of the world's wheat exports.

The Russian invasion has disrupted planting and harvesting in Ukraine. Sanctions against Moscow, for their part, have restricted shipping — further limiting food supplies.

Who's most at risk? Countries in the Middle East and North Africa that depend on these grain imports, like Egypt.

Read Now Show less
Egypt Wants COP27 To Be All About Implementation | Global Stage | GZERO Media

Egypt wants COP27 to be all about implementation

Later this year, Egypt will be hosting the COP27 Climate Summit. What does the gathering hope to accomplish at such an uncertain time for climate action?

It's time to go from pledges and commitments to implementation, Egyptian Minister for International Cooperation Rania al-Mashat says during a Global Stage livestream conversation hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with Microsoft.

"We want it to be an implementation COP," she explains. "And for that to happen, there needs to be a way for all the private-sector commitments that were made in Glasgow to make their ways to countries. And the only way to do that is if more climate finance ... is presented to actually de-risk some of the private-sector investments."

Read Now Show less
What Happens If/When Russia Attends the G20 Summit In Indonesia? | Global Stage | GZERO Media

What happens if Russia attends the 2022 G20 Bali summit?

This year's G20 summit is in Indonesia — and Russia's invited. What'll happen? Will the US and its allies walk out of rooms when the Russians show up?

The G20 consensus has been fragmented over the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Indonesian Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati says during a Global Stage livestream conversation hosted by GZERO Media in partnership with Microsoft.

Read Now Show less
Paige Fusco

If the economy is so good, why does it seem so bad?

The US economy grew 5.7% in 2021, the biggest annual growth rate in decades, yet at the beginning of 2022, less than a third of Americans thought it was strong. As the world confronts the converging crises of the lingering pandemic and war in Ukraine, inflation and skyrocketing prices are further contributing to feelings of financial insecurity around the globe.

The latest episode of Living Beyond Borders, a special podcast series from GZERO brought to you by Citi Private Bank, takes a look at why there is still reason for optimism, and what we can expect from US and global markets over the next year. Moderated by Shari Friedman, managing director of climate and sustainability at Eurasia Group, the discussion features David Bailin, chief investment officer and global head of investments at Citi Global Wealth, and Robert Kahn, director of global macroeconomics at Eurasia Group.

Read Now Show less

Subscribe to GZERO Media's newsletter, Signal

Latest