{{ subpage.title }}

Adam Grant reimagines work after COVID

As the pandemic recedes in some parts of the world, many employers—from Fortune 500 CEOs to small business owners—are bringing their workers back to the office full time. The thing is, not all of those employees want to go back. On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer speaks with renowned organizational psychologist Adam Grant about how to reimagine "work" in a post-pandemic world. Plus, a look at how the paid family leave benefits in the United States stack up to other developed nations (hint: not so great).

Why (and where) Universal Basic Income is becoming more popular

Long before Andrew Yang launched his scrappy 2020 presidential campaign, Universal Basic Income (UBI), the idea that the government provides every adult citizen with a set amount of cash on a regular basis (no strings attached), has been growing in popularity. And it's not just "talk" at this point. A few countries like Kenya, Finland and even Iran have launched nationwide unconditional cash transfer programs, and many others have launched smaller-scale programs. 54% of Americans oppose a UBI program, according to a 2020 PEW study. Unsurprisingly, most Democrats support it and most Republicans oppose it…many saying a UBI would discourage people from looking for jobs. But worldwide, the coronavirus pandemic has only supercharged the UBI movement, as it further widened the chasm of global economic inequality.

Watch the episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer: Is modern society broken?

Podcast: The LSE’s Minouche Shafik on how to fix our broken society

Listen: It was an ongoing question before the pandemic, but coronavirus has made it all the more urgent. With global inequality and extreme poverty on the rise, how do we patch up the many holes in the world's social safety nets? The idea of governments providing all adults with a set amount of cash on a regular basis, no strings attached, is gaining attention worldwide — especially given the need to expand post-pandemic social safety nets. But for London School of Economics Director Minouche Shafik, universal basic income "is like giving up on people." Shafik speaks with Ian Bremmer on the GZERO World Podcast.

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

One economist’s argument against universal basic income

The idea of governments providing all adults with a set amount of cash on a regular basis, no strings attached, is gaining attention worldwide — especially given the need to expand post-pandemic social safety nets. But for London School of Economics Director Minouche Shafik, universal basic income "is like giving up on people." Find out why on the latest episode of GZERO World, which begins airing on US public television Friday, May 28. Check local listings.

Multinational corporations aren't about to give up on global business

An op-ed in the Financial Times argues that the era of borderless enterprise may be past, thanks to rising geopolitical tensions between the US and China. In "Geopolitics spells the demise of the global chief executive," Elisabeth Braw writes that the nationalities of companies and their chief executives now matter again and their ability to pursue a truly global business strategy will be limited. But has the situation actually changed? Ian Bremmer and Eurasia Group analyst Charles Dunst take out the Red Pen to explain that nationalities have always mattered, and many of these risks aren't new.

Read Now Show less

Demography and destiny: blessing or time bomb?

Demography is destiny. That ominous-sounding pronouncement, credited to French philosopher Auguste Comte, is today taken to mean that a nation's fate depends on the youthfulness of its population. For a poor country to become rich, it needs lots of young people ready to work, to support those too old or too young to work, and to pay taxes. This is called the "demographic dividend."

That's an important part of China's success story. Over the past 40 years, more than one billion people have emerged from poverty in China. Waves of young people surged from the countryside into cities to work in factories. The state invested in education, and wages helped young workers, and then their children, go to school. The state also began a drive to develop the technologies of the future, by any means necessary. In China, once dirt-poor, hundreds of millions have created a middle class.

Read Now Show less

Cryptocurrency going mainstream but EU & US regulators face challenges

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

Has cryptocurrency finally gone mainstream?

Well, it certainly looks like that because after some people had invested in bitcoins out of curiosity or the quiet hope to make a fortune, now the EU and the European Central Bank are considering a digital euro. And this week, Visa announced that it would accept crypto coins, too. So those developments may help facilitate trust in an area that is also known to be a safe haven for criminal money.

Read Now Show less

Stopping the debt spiral in the world's poorest nations

"There needs to be a dramatic and deep reduction in the amount of debt on the poorest countries. That's clear." As the world's poorest nations struggle to recover from a devastating pandemic, World Bank President David Malpass argues that freeing them of much of their debt will be key. His conversation with Ian Bremmer is part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Subscribe to GZERO Media's newsletter, Signal

Latest