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What are the details of the European recovery fund proposed by Germany and France?

What are the details of their French and German, European recovery plan?

Well, skip the details for the time being, the real proposal has got to come from the Commission on the 27th. But it's going to be a mix of normal budget funding and then it's got to be the European Commission allowed to take up a loan, and then to distribute part of that money to the different affected countries according to certain criteria. Lots of details yet to be worked out. But the essence has got to be roughly that, I suspect.

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The politics of reopening in Europe

Just weeks ago, Europe was the global epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now some of its hardest hit countries are cautiously reopening their economies after nearly two months of lockdown. Beginning this week, Italy is allowing some factories and construction sites to start up again, while Spain is allowing hairdressers and other small businesses to reopen, and Germany is starting to send kids back to school. France is also planning to ease its own lockdown this week.

Political leaders in these countries have faced the acute first phase of the outbreak. But now they'll grapple with the economic and social shocks it has left behind, while trying to avoid a large-scale second wave of infection. Here's a look at the political context each government faces.

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Can the eurozone survive with its economy shrinking at a record rate?

Can the Eurozone survive with the economy going downhill as fast as it does? What can be done?

Yes, it can survive. But it's going to be tricky times. I think all of the advanced economies are going to suffer very significant setbacks in terms of economic growth. And there is a need for enormous stimulus and demand support measures. That's already also done. The problem that is there in the eurozone is the discrepancy between the economic performance of the different countries. And that will have to be sort of addressed.

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Coronavirus Politics Daily: Singapore shutdown, European strawberries stranded, Mossad's medical mission

Singapore's "circuit breaker" lockdown: The Asian financial hub of Singapore has been held up as an example of a country that had the COVID-19 outbreak under better control than most. The chief of the World Health Organization chief even singled out Singapore for praise, commending its "all-government approach" to containment and mitigation of the deadly disease. But after experiencing its largest daily rise in new cases, it will now shutter schools, workplaces, and non-essential businesses for at least a month, in a move dubbed a "circuit breaker" to stop the disease's spread. The growth of "unlinked" or untraceable community infections is part of "very worrying trends," a government minister said Friday. Come Tuesday, Singaporeans will join half of humanity under stay-at-home orders. If even the countries that have done best at fighting coronavirus still have to take more drastic measures like this, it's a grim sign for what awaits the rest of the world.

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Europe First with Sigmar Gabriel

Ian talks with Sigmar Gabriel, formerly Germany’s Foreign Minister and Vice-Chancellor and currently an outspoken member of the Bundestag. That’s like the U.S. House of Representatives with a two-beer minimum. And of course, we’ve got your Puppet Regime.

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